Health and Medicine


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Choosing residential care for a loved one if often a difficult decision. Linda Cho, executive director of Stellar care, joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about the new models of residential care, family involvement, care with dignity and more.

UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute's Larry Smarr, noted authority in information technology and high-performance computing hosts a discussion with UC San Diego's Rob Knight, leading expert on microbiomes and bioinformatics who is widely renowned for his early and innovative investigations of the symbiotic relationships between microbial life and humans, about how the unique cyberinfrastructure resources for Big Data at UC San Diego will drive applications in the new frontier of microbiome research.

Neglected tropical diseases like Chagas disease and schistosimiasis affect millions worldwide. Many not only cause physical symptoms but create a cycle of poverty difficult to overcome. James McKerrow, PhD, MD, dean of the UCSD Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, joins host David Granet, MD to discuss how pharmacists are working to develop new drugs to combat these diseases. He also shares how the role of the pharmacist in US healthcare is changing as patients increasingly look to them for not only novel treatments but primary health services. Recorded on 10/23/2015.

Interest in the human microbiome has moved quickly from frontier science to public awareness. Larry Smarr, Director of CalIT2 at UC San Diego, describes the ways he uses technology to gather body data to track his internal biomarkers and how microbiome research is blossoming at UC San Diego. Recorded on 01/20/2016.

Bill Mobley welcomes Fatta Nahab whose novel use of brain imaging techniques is revealing clues in understanding and developing new therapies to treat movement disorders. Recorded on 02/29/2016.

Students, administrators and academic researchers demonstrate the value of learning music in school as they show improvements in English and Math test scores, class attendance rates, cognitive development, self-esteem and the ability to work with others. Featured are Francisco Escobedo, the superintendent of the Chula Vista Elementary School District; UC San Diego cognitive scientists Terry Jernigan and John Iversen; and young musicians participating in the Community Opus Project, an in-school and after school music program led by Dalouge Smith, the president and CEO of the San Diego Youth Symphony and Conservatory.

What does sex have to do with human reproduction? Within the next 20 to 30 years or so, perhaps not much. At least that's how Henry T. Greely sees it. He's the Director of the Center for Law and Biosciences at Stanford University. He's also the author of a new book called The End of Sex and the Future of Human Reproduction. In this edition of Up Next, Greely talks about the coming revolution in reproduction, which, he says, will not only increasingly divorce sex from making babies, but also give parents more and more control over what genes their children will have. Recorded on 05/11/2016.

A panel of experts discusses the PBS NOVA program Can Alzheimer's Be Stopped? and the disease itself. Join Kenneth Kosik, MD (Co-Director Neuroscience Research Institute UC Santa Barbara), Sarah Holt (Producer and Director HHMI/Tangled Bank Studios), and Rhonda Spiegel (CEO, Alzheimer's Association, California Central Chapter) and Francisco Lopera, MD (Professor of Behavioral Neurology, Chief of Neurosciences Program-University of Antioquia, Coordinator Group of Neurosciences of Antioquia). The discussion is moderated by Julia Cort, Deputy Executive Producer for NOVA. Recorded on 04/12/2016.

Chris Freise, MD Professor of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, and Brian Lee, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine' Division of Transplantation, UCSF. Recorded on 06/03/2016.

Each year millions of people go to the doctor because of dizziness. Dr. Kimberley Bell, DPT hosts a panel of experienced clinicians to explore the multi-factorial causes of dizziness and vertigo, and offer strategies and tips to find relief. The neurological and vestibular causes of dizziness and vertigo are discussed.

How does the genome impact human health and our risk for psychiatric and developmental disorders? What is the interplay between our genes and our environment? Jonathan Sebat, PhD, Director, Beyster Institute for Psychiatric Genomics Professor of Psychiatry, Cellular & Molecular Medicine, and Pediatrics, UC San Diego School of Medicine joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss the genetic causes for autism and how technology can help pinpoint those causes and influence potential therapies.

For the past three decades the largest family in the world with a genetic form of Alzheimer's disease has been tracked. This extended family of some 5,000 individuals live in Antioquia, Colombia among a people who call themselves Paisa. Passing relentlessly through the generations with 100% penetrance is a mutation that causes early onset Alzheimer's disease in its carriers. Dr. Kenneth Kosik explains that the mutation in the Americas likely originated from a Spanish conquistador whose progeny are the members of the family we see today. Recently, interest in the family has grown because they are now participating in a clinical trial intended to delay the onset of the disease. Recorded on 06/30/2016.

New York Times reporter Anahad O'Connor sits down with former FDA commissioner Dr. David Kessler for discussion on the fat, sugar and salt in food that conditions us to eat more and changes our brain circuitry leading to obesity. Recorded on 10/27/2016.

John Roberts, MD. Chief of UCSF Transplant Service. Recorded on 11/04/2016.

J. Craig Venter, founder, chair and CEO of the J. Craig Venter Institute and co-founder of two private genomics companies, recounts his breakthroughs in genome sequencing and shares new research on fighting cancer tumors with personalized vaccines. Venter is presented by the Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute at UC San Diego.

2016 Kavli Prize recipient Carla Shatz from Stanford University presents a lively exploration of how understanding early stages of neural development may be leading to a pathway for developing treatments for Alzheimer's Disease. Recorded on 12/02/2016.

Phyllis Ferrell, Vice President and Global Development Leader for Alzheimer's Disease at Eli Lilly and Company joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about the goal set forth in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease to "prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025." Ferrell's shares her work to make Alzheimer's dementia preventable by finding ways to slow disease progression and advocating for early diagnosis. Recorded on 12/8/2016.

Can people really be sensitive to weather? / Climate change and health / 3D printing and custom replacement joints / Tai chi: Art of movement.

Moderator: Dr. Peter Pronovost, Sr. Vice President for Patient Safety and Quality, Director of the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, Johns Hopkins Medicine. Panelists: Sheila Antrum, Dr. Robert Cherry, Dr. Laura Esserman, Dr. Julie A. Freischlag

Substances that might seem innocent can be toxic. Dr. Kent Olson is the Medical Director of the San Francisco Poison Control System. He helps us understand when plants and fungi can be toxic and how to avoid misbegotten uses of herbal medications. Recorded on 03/15/2017.
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