Public Affairs


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UC Berkeley lecturer Saru Jayaraman gives a rousing talk describing the harsh and unequal treatment of the nation's restaurant staff as she argues for increasing the minimum wage in what is now the second largest and fastest growing industry in the country. Jayaraman is presented as the keynote speaker at the Fall 2014 Board of Advisors Dinner for the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 10/23/2014.

Investigative journalist Bob Woodward and former White House aide Alex Butterfield join Michael Bernstein for a conversation about Butterfield's decision to reveal the existence of tape recordings that eventually led to Richard Nixon's resignation from the presidency.

In this candid and heartwarming interview, Tam O'Shaughnessy, the life partner of the late astronaut Sally Ride, describes her long relationship with the first American woman in space. From their days on the teen tennis circuit in California through Sally's historic flights on the Space Shuttle Challenger to their parallel academic careers and later, founding their own company, Tam tells how their deep friendship blossomed over time into a romance that ended with Sally's death from cancer in 2012. As the Executive Director of Sally Ride Science@UC San Diego, Tam continues to inspire girls to embrace STEM, and shares her profound pride as the sponsor of the newly commissioned R/V Sally Ride, the first Naval academic research vessel ever named for a woman, now operated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

Author Zohreh Ghahremani talks with Babak Rahimi, associate professor of Communication, Culture and Religion at UC San Diego about the novel, "Sky of Red Poppies," the 2012 selection for One Book, One San Diego.

Writer/producer/director Theodore Melfi, actor Kevin Costner and president of Fox 2000 Pictures, Elizabeth Gabler discuss the Oscar-nominated film based on the true story about three brilliant African-American women working on John Glenn's launch into orbit at NASA. Recorded on 01/12/2017.

Veteran labor activist Dolores Huerta joins food journalist Rose Hayden-Smith and others for an animated discussion on why food insecurity still exists in many communities and what is being done to increase access to healthy, organic food. Farmers, healthcare providers and urban planners bring their insights to this conversation as they share stories of connecting people with the food they need to thrive. This program is the fifth in a Future Thought Leaders series on food sustainability presented by the Berry Good Food Foundation. Convened by BGFF Founder Michelle Ciccarelli Lerach, speakers include Daron "Farmer D" Joffe of Coastal Roots Farm, Dave Murphy of Food Democracy Now!, Paul Watson of the Global Action Research Center, Fernando Sañudo of the Vista Community Clinic and Jillian Barber of Sharp HealthCare.

NATO Deputy Secretary General Rose Gottemoeller explores how gender issues are handled in the fields of security and defense. She notes that even well-supported institutional efforts to increase awareness and training often fall short of the mark and offers suggestions on how to make them more effective. Gottemoeller is presented by the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of San Diego.

Customs and tax attorneys from the US and Mexico explain how some proposed increases in cross border taxes and border adjustment taxes will affect trade in North America. This is the eighth program in the nine-part "What's Next for NAFTA?" series exploring the future of the North American economy, sponsored by the Center for US-Mexican Studies at UC San Diego.

Nina Jablonski explores the nature and sequence of changes in human skin through prehistory, and the consequences of these changes for the lives of people today. Recorded on 03/01/2017.

We are a country in which a majority of people who voted for one candidate in 2016 don't know anybody who voted for the other. We have a president who divided the country in a way that lost him the popular vote but gave him an electoral college victory. At the same time, many different kinds of Americans feel shortchanged by an economy that treats different groups in different regions very differently. Are we becoming a nation in which some of us find it impossible to empathize with others among our fellow citizens not only when the problems involved are different, but also when they're similar? And are our religious institutions helping to heal these divides, or are they deepening them? Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne explores these and other questions. Recorded on 02/28/2017.

The paradox of today's global food system is that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world's population. Underlying these problems is an overabundant and overly competitive food system in which companies are forced to expand market channels to meet corporate growth targets. The contradiction between the goals of public health and food corporations has led to a large and growing food movement in the United States, which seeks policy changes to promote healthier and more environmentally sound food choices. Marion Nestle considers the cultural, economic, and institutional factors that influence food policies and choices, and the balance between individual and societal responsibility for those choices. Recorded on 03/21/2017.

When inmates are released after serving time, their ordeals are not over. Finding stability and purpose on the outside can be daunting, leading many to end up back in jail or prison. But, as Nicholas Alexander, director of the Reentry Success Center in Richmond, California, explains, it doesn't have to be that way. His center works with prisoners before and after incarceration to provide counseling, housing, employment, legal and other free services that help them reintegrate into their families and communities. Alexander's compassion for the people he serves is evident in this conversation with Jonathan Stein, a fellow alumnus of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley.

The California Policy Lab, as UC Berkeley's Jesse Rothstein and Evan White explain, is a new research center that creates data-driven insights for the public good. Academics at Berkeley and UCLA can now work with state and local governments to generate scientific evidence for policy solutions to address California's most urgent problems, including homelessness, poverty, crime, and education inequality. Rothstein and White, who have both worked in government, share their enthusiasm for these partnerships in this conversation with Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley.

Rosina Bierbaum, formerly of President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and an Adaptation Fellow at the World Bank shows how climate change will affect all regions and sectors of the economy, and disproportionately affect the poorest people on the planet. Therefore, improving the resilience, adaptation, and preparedness of communities must be a high priority, equal to that of achieving deep greenhouse gas reductions,and rapid development and deployment of innovative technologies, as well as altered planning and management strategies, will be needed in the coming decades to achieve a sustainable world. Recorded on 05/08/2017.

Experts on international relations, conflict and religion engage in an informed debate about the extent and nature of the threat ISIS poses and how the US should respond. Monica Duffy Toft is Director of the Center for Strategic Studies at Tufts University. Marc Gopin is the Director of the Center on Religion, Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution at George Mason University. Moderated by Mark Juergensmeyer, Professor of Sociology and Global Studies at UCSB. Recorded on 05/18/2017.

Events at Standing Rock from April 2016 to February 2017 created new ways to protect the water and land. This panel features some of the organizers of the actions opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline. Panelists: Mark Tilsen, Jasilyn Charger and Joye Braun. Moderator: Margaret McMurtrey. Recorded on 05/19/2017.

Clinical psychologist Erik Groessl talks about research showing the value of yoga in reducing pain, improving physical function and overcoming opioid addiction in military veterans, among other patients, in this conversation with Paul J. Mills of UC San Diego.
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