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In his new book, Spitting in the Soup: Inside the Dirty Game of Doping in Sports, UC San Diego alumnus and sports journalist Mark Johnson traces the doping culture in professional sports, from the early days when pills meant progress, to the current day, when athletes are vilified for the use of performance-enhancing drugs. In his book, Johnson, who has covered cycling as a writer and photographer since the 1980s, explores the complex relationships that underlie elite sports culture.

In his highly-acclaimed book, The Nazis Next Door, Eric Lichtblau tells the shocking and shameful story of how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men. Lichtblau explains here how it was possible for thousands of Nazis -- from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich -- to move to the U.S. after WWII, and quietly settle into new lives as Americans. Some of them gained entry as self-styled refugees, while others enjoyed the help and protection of the CIA, the FBI, and the military, who put them to work as spies, intelligence assets, and leading scientists and engineers. Lichtblau's book draws from once-secret government records and interviews, telling the full story of the Nazi scientists brought to America, and the German spies and con men who followed them and lived for decades as Americans. He is presented by the Holocaust Living History Workshop at UC San Diego.

Hear from six Berkeley Lab scientists with big new ideas designed to help transform our carbon-drenched, overheating world. These short presentations cover desalination, energy efficient window coating, capturing carbon, energy from ocean waves, alternate fuel for your car, and an app that compares fuel economy or EV range. Recorded on 06/01/2017.

Nina Jablonski explores the nature and sequence of changes in human skin through prehistory, and the consequences of these changes for the lives of people today. Recorded on 03/01/2017.

Design thinking -- it's a popular buzzword these days, with companies from IBM to GE using this approach to develop innovative products and reinvigorate their operations. But what exactly is design thinking and why is it playing an increasingly important role in K-12 education? Design thinking, or human-centered design, is all about focusing on the needs of people to ensure that the correct problem is being solved in the most effective way. With critical thinking skills becoming increasingly important in a knowledge-based economy, many educators see design thinking as a way to tap into students' passions while enabling them to solve problems in an ever-more diverse and interconnected world. This panel of experts shares their insight on design thinking and its power to transform classrooms and equip students with 21st century skills vital to success.

The paradox of today's global food system is that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world's population. Underlying these problems is an overabundant and overly competitive food system in which companies are forced to expand market channels to meet corporate growth targets. The contradiction between the goals of public health and food corporations has led to a large and growing food movement in the United States, which seeks policy changes to promote healthier and more environmentally sound food choices. Marion Nestle considers the cultural, economic, and institutional factors that influence food policies and choices, and the balance between individual and societal responsibility for those choices. Recorded on 03/21/2017.

As an advocate for the California hospitals that provide the core of the state's healthcare safety net, Jackie Bender is on high alert over calls to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. She talks here with Jonathan Stein about how GOP plans in Congress would affect the millions of patients who now depend on the medical centers she represents as the Vice President of Policy for California Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems. Bender and Stein are both alumni of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 03/28/2017.

Women who are elected to Congress perform better, on average, than their male counterparts, according to research conducted by political scientist Sarah Anzia of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. They secure more federal funding for their districts, sponsor or co-sponsor more legislation and are seen as more collaborative with fellow members. But why are there so few in Congress? In many cases, it's just about being asked. Anzia's analysis shows that women are more likely to take the leap if they are encouraged to become candidates. In this conversation with Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy, Anzia also explains the politics of pension benefits (no one likes to vote against proposed increases) and the impact on voter turnout in off-cycle elections. Recorded on 03/30/2017.

Drawing on her own experience growing up in the caste system in India, Sudha Shetty channels her compassion for others into research and advocacy for victims of domestic violence and child abduction. As she describes here in a conversation with Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, Shetty has helped judges and others in the legal community protect women and children from the unintended consequences of poorly drafted policies.

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989, becoming the first Nobel laureate to be recognized for his concern for global environmental problems. He addressed an audience at UC San Diego focusing on love and kindness among humanity. He urged compassion and sharing each other's problems as one human family to overcome the distance and violence in the world. Recorded on 06/17/2017.

With the US's commitment to the Paris Agreement in question and the future of federal climate change policy unclear, what steps should California take to remain at the forefront of climate action policy? UC Berkeley's Meredith Fowlie, Sol Hsiang, and Carol Zabin join in a discussion moderated by Center for Environmental Public Policy Executive Director Ned Helme about California's policy options given potential conflicts with the Trump administration on issues of climate change and the environment. This presentation was part of Cal Day 2017, sponsored by the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 04/22/2017.
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