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Veteran trial attorney William L. Lerach recounts his successful class action law suits against companies that prospered by taking advantage of Holocaust victims.

UC Berkeley economist Robert Reich reveals how power and influence have created a new American oligarchy, a shrinking middle class, and the greatest income inequality and wealth disparity in 80 years. Citing his latest book, "Saving Capitalism: For the Many, Not the Few," Goldman School of Public Policy Professor Reich lays out what he argues must be done to restore democracy and rebuild the US economy. Reich is the featured speaker for the 7th annual Michael Nacht Distinguished Lecture in Politics and Policy. Recorded on 12/01/2015.

Renowned climatologist V. Ramanathan from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography makes a moral argument for mitigating climate change, arguing that it is caused by a fraction of the world's population but is affecting everyone on this planet. He urges scientists and policy makers to reach out to religious leaders, as he has done with the Pope and the Dalai Lama, and ask them to join together in pursuing solutions for the common good.

In his new book, Spitting in the Soup: Inside the Dirty Game of Doping in Sports, UC San Diego alumnus and sports journalist Mark Johnson traces the doping culture in professional sports, from the early days when pills meant progress, to the current day, when athletes are vilified for the use of performance-enhancing drugs. In his book, Johnson, who has covered cycling as a writer and photographer since the 1980s, explores the complex relationships that underlie elite sports culture.

Phillip Atiba Goff, Co-Founder and President, Center for Policing Equity, is a psychologist known for researching the relationship between race and policing in the United States. He is an expert in contemporary forms of racial bias and discrimination. In a "A New Language of Justice," Dr. Goff outlines an updated, research-based framework for discussing issues of community and race relations as they pertain to law enforcement policies, one that emphasizes outcomes rather than intentions. Recorded on 01/12/2017.

How did Zionist immigrants to early 20th century Palestine conceive of their new Arab neighbors, and how did the Arab natives make sense of the Jews arriving on Palestine's shores? Drawing on his book Defining Neighbors: Religion, Race, and the Early Zionist-Arab Encounter, Jonathan Marc Gribetz argues that this fateful encounter was initially imagined very differently from the way it ultimately developed. The Late Ottoman period in Palestine was no utopia, but exploring this moment reveals that today's hardened dividing lines are far from timeless; they have a fascinating history. Recorded on 11/06/2016.

Dorothy Robyn, now an independent analyst, shares tales of her time in government overseeing energy and environmental budget issues on military bases, participating in a public/private partnership with Ivanka Trump that converted Washington's Old Post Office Pavilion into a hotel, and preventing a life-saving satellite system from being destroyed, a feat most recently recounted "Eccentric Orbits: The Iridium Story." Robyn's conversation with Henry E. Brady, Dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, is the second of three in "The Budget Series," featuring UC GSPP alumni who are fiscal policy experts in Washington. Recorded on 11/04/2016.

Sociologist Mary C. Waters of Harvard University paints a comprehensive and compelling picture of the immigrant experience in the United States. As the chair of a recent National Academy of Sciences report on immigration integration, Waters explains that while many aspects of immigrants' lives improve over time and across generations, there are other significant challenges that remain. She highlights the key issues in this conversation with John Skrentny, the co-director of the Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at UC San Diego.

Messaging expert Anat Shenker-Osorio, author of "Don't Buy It: The Trouble with Talking Nonsense About the Economy," describes how to best influence public opinion. Citing her research on causes such as abortion rights and gay marriage, she argues that the most effective way to change minds is not through the traditional "anger, hope, action" model, but instead to establish shared values with political opponents and then to present the problems that threaten those values along with potential solutions. Shenker-Osorio engages in this fascinating discussion with civil rights attorney Jonathan Stein, a fellow alum of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 01/05/2017.

Garance Burke, an investigative reporter with the Associated Press, recounts her most impactful work of 2016, including coverage of Donald Trump's crude behavior on the set of "The Apprentice" and the abuse of Central American migrant children in California. She also describes the value of using big data in journalism and AP's new partnership with Facebook aimed at debunking fake news. Burke shares her experiences and insights with civil rights attorney Jonathan Stein, a fellow alum of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Recorded on 01/05/2017.

Eli Berman, a former soldier for the Israel Defense Forces and now the research director for security studies for the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation and chair of the Economics department at UC San Diego, details the consequences of providing development assistance to areas in conflict, such as Syria or ISIS-controlled territories, and offers ideas on fight in asymmetrical civil wars in this talk presented by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UC San Diego.
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