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Our bodies are made up of trillions of different types of cells that carry out specific life processes. The way that these cells function is defined by the microscopic complexes contained within, which are smaller than the wavelength of light. Often times, dysfunction of these tiny cellular complexes lead to diseases, such as cancers and neurodegeneration. In this presentation, The Scripps Reasearch Institutes' Gabriel Lander takes you on an exploration of the field of "structural biology", and the use of an important tool that allows us to image the impossibly small nanomachines in our cells, in order to find out how they work and interact with each other.

The Scripps Research Institute's Dennis Wolan takes you on a fascinating exploration of the human body's ecosystem and the myriad symbiotic relations found there that sustain and affect everything from immunity to behavior, and how his lab "mines" this microbiome for potential therapies.

UC Carbon Slam 2016 brought students from all 10 campuses to Silicon Valley to present their climate science and carbon reduction research in three-minute pitches and posters at a live competition before a panel of esteemed judges and guests. These ten graduate students present short pitches about their research in carbon reduction strategies. Recorded on 05/23/2016.

Cellular modeling may hold the key to unlocking some the most important questions about autism. Alysson R. Muotri, PhD joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to explain how his work is shedding light on not only the pathology of autism but potential new drugs.

This year, California's winter weather has been wet and wild. Join Scripps scientist Marty Ralph, Director of Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E) as he describes the phenomena of atmospheric rivers, their impact on our weather, and the essential role modeling and prediction play in managing California's precious water resources.

Veteran labor activist Dolores Huerta joins food journalist Rose Hayden-Smith and others for an animated discussion on why food insecurity still exists in many communities and what is being done to increase access to healthy, organic food. Farmers, healthcare providers and urban planners bring their insights to this conversation as they share stories of connecting people with the food they need to thrive. This program is the fifth in a Future Thought Leaders series on food sustainability presented by the Berry Good Food Foundation. Convened by BGFF Founder Michelle Ciccarelli Lerach, speakers include Daron "Farmer D" Joffe of Coastal Roots Farm, Dave Murphy of Food Democracy Now!, Paul Watson of the Global Action Research Center, Fernando Sañudo of the Vista Community Clinic and Jillian Barber of Sharp HealthCare.

In the last decade, the scientific foundations of a number of traditional forensic methods have come under increasing criticism by the scientific community, leading to their discontinuation or reduced effectiveness in criminal prosecutions. These challenges raise questions about the admissibility of certain type of evidence in current cases and the validity of previous convictions. We will discuss the basis of these issues and describe some of the work ongoing at LLNL to try and address some of them. In particular we will describe an entirely new science-based approach to human identification.

Igor Grant, MD, FRCP(C) pursues research that addresses real world behavioral problems. Studying the intersection of drugs of abuse (primarily methamphetamine) and infection, his work sheds light on the basic mechanisms of injury for people with HIV. He examines inflammation in the context of neurological disorders and measures the impact of chronic stress on Alzheimer's disease caregivers. Dr. Grant joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss his life in science and his fascinating work.

Big data can give us important information about consumer trends, healthcare and much more. But how can we translate the data from numbers to actionable insights? Data scientists are the key. Hear from people in the field about what it takes to become a data scientist including specialized skills and the importance of curiosity.

Rosina Bierbaum, formerly of President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) and an Adaptation Fellow at the World Bank shows how climate change will affect all regions and sectors of the economy, and disproportionately affect the poorest people on the planet. Therefore, improving the resilience, adaptation, and preparedness of communities must be a high priority, equal to that of achieving deep greenhouse gas reductions,and rapid development and deployment of innovative technologies, as well as altered planning and management strategies, will be needed in the coming decades to achieve a sustainable world. Recorded on 05/08/2017.

Treating depression can be a slow process. Even after pinpointing the correct medication, it can still take weeks to take effect. Abraham A. Palmer, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair for Basic Research in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Diego joins our host Dr. David Granet to discuss his work uncovering of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of depression. Dr. Palmer and his team are exploring how inhibiting the Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) enzyme can reduce signs of depression. He explains the science behind the discovery and the implications for new, faster-acting treatments.

Andy Kieatiwong shares his journey from student to CEO. As the founder and CEO of the Additive Rocket Corporation, he leads a team that leverages 3D metal printing to create reliable and affordable propulsion solutions for space exploration. He speaks with a group of high school seniors about the field of aerospace engineering as well as how to leverage your college experience to find your ideal career. Recorded on 04/15/2017.

The human mind is one of the features that makes our species unusual, and any narrative of our origins must include explanations for how our mental facilities were generated by genetic and cultural evolutionary processes. Comparative studies with the minds of other species and direct studies of how the typical human brain creates the mind are valuable approaches. However, many useful clues can also be gleaned from studying extraordinary variations of the human mind. This Symposium brings together experts who have pursued in-depth explorations of some of these variations. Recorded on 05/05/2017.

The human mind is one of the features that makes our species unusual, and any narrative of our origins must include explanations for how our mental facilities were generated by genetic and cultural evolutionary processes. Comparative studies with the minds of other species and direct studies of how the typical human brain creates the mind are valuable approaches. However, many useful clues can also be gleaned from studying extraordinary variations of the human mind. This Symposium brings together experts who have pursued in-depth explorations of some of these variations. Recorded on 05/05/2017.

The documentary In Utero explores how experiences in utero affect our lives. Director Kathleen Man Gyllenhaal and Producer Stephen Gyllenhaal are be joined by Professor Brenda Major (Psychological and Brain Sciences, UCSB) and Professor Maya Rossin-Slater (Economics, UCSB) for a discussion moderated by Professor Maryam Kia-Keating (Counseling, Clinical, & School Psychology, UCSB). Recorded on 04/27/2017.
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