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Our bodies are made up of trillions of different types of cells that carry out specific life processes. The way that these cells function is defined by the microscopic complexes contained within, which are smaller than the wavelength of light. Often times, dysfunction of these tiny cellular complexes lead to diseases, such as cancers and neurodegeneration. In this presentation, The Scripps Reasearch Institutes' Gabriel Lander takes you on an exploration of the field of "structural biology", and the use of an important tool that allows us to image the impossibly small nanomachines in our cells, in order to find out how they work and interact with each other.

Choosing residential care for a loved one if often a difficult decision. Linda Cho, executive director of Stellar care, joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about the new models of residential care, family involvement, care with dignity and more.

UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute's Larry Smarr, noted authority in information technology and high-performance computing hosts a discussion with UC San Diego's Rob Knight, leading expert on microbiomes and bioinformatics who is widely renowned for his early and innovative investigations of the symbiotic relationships between microbial life and humans, about how the unique cyberinfrastructure resources for Big Data at UC San Diego will drive applications in the new frontier of microbiome research.

Immunologist Erica Ollman Saphire, an expert who has worked on the front lines in west Africa battling viral hemorrhagic fevers, gives a fascinating and sometimes frightening on-the-ground account of how the VIC global consortium developed the only effective strategy to fight the Ebola virus. Recorded on 04/23/2016.

Interest in the human microbiome has moved quickly from frontier science to public awareness. Larry Smarr, Director of CalIT2 at UC San Diego, describes the ways he uses technology to gather body data to track his internal biomarkers and how microbiome research is blossoming at UC San Diego. Recorded on 01/20/2016.

What does sex have to do with human reproduction? Within the next 20 to 30 years or so, perhaps not much. At least that's how Henry T. Greely sees it. He's the Director of the Center for Law and Biosciences at Stanford University. He's also the author of a new book called The End of Sex and the Future of Human Reproduction. In this edition of Up Next, Greely talks about the coming revolution in reproduction, which, he says, will not only increasingly divorce sex from making babies, but also give parents more and more control over what genes their children will have. Recorded on 05/11/2016.

Over the last 30 years predictions of climate change as a threat to individuals, societies and nations have changed from possibilities to realities. Ethical issues associated with which individuals, companies, nations cause climate change, who might benefit from it, and who will suffer from the impacts have been part of the discussion from the beginning. How has thinking about the ethics of climate change evolved during that time and how does this relate to the ethics of extreme mitigation efforts like climate engineering? Margaret Leinen, UC San Diego Vice Chancellor for Marine Sciences, Director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Dean of the School of Marine Sciences discusses what can be done, what is being done, and the ethical implications of deploying solutions.

Each year millions of people go to the doctor because of dizziness. Dr. Kimberley Bell, DPT hosts a panel of experienced clinicians to explore the multi-factorial causes of dizziness and vertigo, and offer strategies and tips to find relief. The neurological and vestibular causes of dizziness and vertigo are discussed.

Animal development is directed by a genetic toolkit shared by all animals from fruit flies to frogs to human beings rather than different animals having different genetic toolkits. UCLA Professor of Biological Chemistry Edward De Robertis explains that the field of evolutionary development (or Evo-Devo) seeks to understand how so many beautiful animal forms evolved through the use of the original genetic toolkit of the last common ancestor of all animals, urbilateria, which existed at least 560 million years ago. Recorded on 10.25.2016.

Renewable chemicals derived from plant biomass are attractive alternatives to those made from petroleum. To make them on the necessary scale chemical engineer Michelle O'Malley is looking at the digestive tract of large herbivores in order to engineer anaerobic gut microbes for improved biomass breakdown and chemical production. Recorded on 06/28/2016.

Long term, sustained ocean observations provide scientists with much needed insight into natural and human induced changes in the world ocean. Join NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center Director Francisco Werner as he provides a broad perspective on ocean observing and its scientific value and application, as well as a close up look at the important monitoring effort in our own coastal ocean, the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations. Recorded on 11/14/2016.

For the past three decades the largest family in the world with a genetic form of Alzheimer's disease has been tracked. This extended family of some 5,000 individuals live in Antioquia, Colombia among a people who call themselves Paisa. Passing relentlessly through the generations with 100% penetrance is a mutation that causes early onset Alzheimer's disease in its carriers. Dr. Kenneth Kosik explains that the mutation in the Americas likely originated from a Spanish conquistador whose progeny are the members of the family we see today. Recently, interest in the family has grown because they are now participating in a clinical trial intended to delay the onset of the disease. Recorded on 06/30/2016.

Statistics is the science of data: measuring and assessing uncertainty and more generally, learning from data. Since scientific, technical, and social disciplines all need to make conclusions based on data, statistics provides them with tools essential for their advances. From player stats to computer models to simulate the effects of climate change statistics play a key role. Recorded on 02/27/2016.

Three fascinating presentations reveal how exploring changes during critical periods of brain development may lead to interventions, therapies and perhaps cures to conditions from learning disabilities to Alzheimer's Disease.

2016 Kavli Prize recipient Carla Shatz from Stanford University presents a lively exploration of how understanding early stages of neural development may be leading to a pathway for developing treatments for Alzheimer's Disease. Recorded on 12/02/2016.

Nina Jablonski explores the nature and sequence of changes in human skin through prehistory, and the consequences of these changes for the lives of people today. Recorded on 03/01/2017.
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