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Join Robert Norris, Associate Professor and Associate Botanist at UC Davis, as he discusses home vegetable gardening. Topics include tools needed, recommended reading, ground preparation, planting dates, selection of varieties, and seed planting depths.

The Scripps Research Institutes' Ryan Shenvi, who searches for ways to synthesize new medicines from both synthetic and natural sources, explores the crucial roles of imagination and critical thinking in the practice of the scientific method.

Computer simulations of earthquake shaking can provide valuable information on the expected intensity of shaking from earthquakes. Arthur Rodgers, a seismologist/geophysicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, covers seismic hazard in the Bay Area, describes computer simulations of past and possible future earthquakes and looks at the physics that underlies the numerical methods.

On this edition of Computing Primetime Ravi Ramamoorthi, director of the new UC San Diego Center for Visual Computing - or VisComp - is joined by two other faculty members on the interdisciplinary roster of UC San Diego researchers in the center: Cognitive Science professor Zhuowen Tu, and Qualcomm Institute research scientist Jurgen Schulze, who also teaches computer graphics in the Computer Science and Engineering department. In a wide-ranging conversation they discuss the three grand research themes that underpin VisComp activities: Mobile visual computing and digital imaging to capture, process and display the visual world with smartphones and other devices; Interactive digital (augmented) reality to allow us to render and mix real and virtual content seamlessly and realistically in real time, and the ability to automate computer-based visual understanding of the world from small-scale underwater organisms to large cities.

Renowned climatologist V. Ramanathan from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography makes a moral argument for mitigating climate change, arguing that it is caused by a fraction of the world's population but is affecting everyone on this planet. He urges scientists and policy makers to reach out to religious leaders, as he has done with the Pope and the Dalai Lama, and ask them to join together in pursuing solutions for the common good.

The severe drought gripping the western United States in recent years is changing the landscape well beyond localized effects of water restrictions and browning lawns. Geophysicist Adrian Borsa describes how the loss of water across the west is causing the entire region to rise like an uncoiling spring. Recorded on 02/08/2016.

Animal development is directed by a genetic toolkit shared by all animals from fruit flies to frogs to human beings rather than different animals having different genetic toolkits. UCLA Professor of Biological Chemistry Edward De Robertis explains that the field of evolutionary development (or Evo-Devo) seeks to understand how so many beautiful animal forms evolved through the use of the original genetic toolkit of the last common ancestor of all animals, urbilateria, which existed at least 560 million years ago. Recorded on 10.25.2016.

For the past three decades the largest family in the world with a genetic form of Alzheimer's disease has been tracked. This extended family of some 5,000 individuals live in Antioquia, Colombia among a people who call themselves Paisa. Passing relentlessly through the generations with 100% penetrance is a mutation that causes early onset Alzheimer's disease in its carriers. Dr. Kenneth Kosik explains that the mutation in the Americas likely originated from a Spanish conquistador whose progeny are the members of the family we see today. Recently, interest in the family has grown because they are now participating in a clinical trial intended to delay the onset of the disease. Recorded on 06/30/2016.

Everything we can see and touch is made up of chemical elements as illustrated on the Periodic Table of Elements. The heaviest, naturally occurring element is uranium. Using high-energy particle accelerators, scientists have created even heavier elements extending the Periodic Table of Elements up to element 118. Also find out more about element 116, Livermorium, named in in honor of the scientists and research that has been done at LLNL since its discovery. Recorded on 02/06/2016.

Anna Lappé looks at the hidden cost of our food system: the climate crisis. Our web of global food production and distribution is connected to as much as one third of total greenhouse-gas emissions. She offers a vision of a food system that can be part of healing the planet. Recorded on 11/10/2016.

J. Craig Venter, founder, chair and CEO of the J. Craig Venter Institute and co-founder of two private genomics companies, recounts his breakthroughs in genome sequencing and shares new research on fighting cancer tumors with personalized vaccines. Venter is presented by the Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute at UC San Diego.

Three fascinating presentations show how explorations into synaptic development and genetic mutation are revealing pathways to better interventions for neurological impairment, from Schizophrenia and Amblyopia to Autism. Recorded on 12/02/2016.

Three fascinating presentations reveal how exploring changes during critical periods of brain development may lead to interventions, therapies and perhaps cures to conditions from learning disabilities to Alzheimer's Disease.
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