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The Scripps Research Institutes' Ryan Shenvi, who searches for ways to synthesize new medicines from both synthetic and natural sources, explores the crucial roles of imagination and critical thinking in the practice of the scientific method.

UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute's Larry Smarr, noted authority in information technology and high-performance computing hosts a discussion with UC San Diego's Rob Knight, leading expert on microbiomes and bioinformatics who is widely renowned for his early and innovative investigations of the symbiotic relationships between microbial life and humans, about how the unique cyberinfrastructure resources for Big Data at UC San Diego will drive applications in the new frontier of microbiome research.

Approximately 1 million Americans currently live with Parkinson's disease. Irene Litvan, MD joins our host William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss the latest advances in PD research. Learn about the progression of the disease, early warning signs, and promising new therapies currently in development.

Interest in the human microbiome has moved quickly from frontier science to public awareness. Larry Smarr, Director of CalIT2 at UC San Diego, describes the ways he uses technology to gather body data to track his internal biomarkers and how microbiome research is blossoming at UC San Diego. Recorded on 01/20/2016.

This symposium brings together scientists representing evolutionary biology, genetics, dermatology, anthropology, and physiology to share their knowledge and questions about human skin in an explicitly evolutionary framework. UC San Diego's Richard Gallo begins with a discussion about Skin, a Window into the Evolution of the Human Super-Organism, followed by Michael Sawka on Human Skin: Sweating, Thermoregulation, and Water Balance, and Sarah Millar on Evolution of Hair Follicles, Mammary Glands, and Sweat Glands in Humans and Other Mammals.

Kevin Plaxco is a professor of chemistry at UCSB. He explains how the ideal molecular sensor will be sensitive, versatile, small enough to hold in your hand, and selective enough to work even when faced with complex samples. He shares how it has proven difficult to create such an item, but that they are working toward creating it. Plaxco has co-authored numerous biosensor patents and more than 165 papers on protein folding, protein dynamics, and folding-based sensors. Recorded on 07/22/2015.

Renewable chemicals derived from plant biomass are attractive alternatives to those made from petroleum. To make them on the necessary scale chemical engineer Michelle O'Malley is looking at the digestive tract of large herbivores in order to engineer anaerobic gut microbes for improved biomass breakdown and chemical production. Recorded on 06/28/2016.

Long term, sustained ocean observations provide scientists with much needed insight into natural and human induced changes in the world ocean. Join NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center Director Francisco Werner as he provides a broad perspective on ocean observing and its scientific value and application, as well as a close up look at the important monitoring effort in our own coastal ocean, the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations. Recorded on 11/14/2016.

What is autism and how can we treat it? Karen Piece, PhD, co-director of the UC San Diego Autism Center of Excellence joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to define autism and share current research. Learn about the importance of early detection, creating standardized screenings, the search for diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and what parents and pediatricians can do to help children with autism.

Despite being diminutive in size, iChips have the potential to make big impacts on drug development and medical treatment testing. Lawrence Livermore National Lab is replicating the human body on a miniature scale, specifically focusing on brain physiology. Capturing human physiology outside the body allows scientists to probe and understand the human body without using human subjects. Staff scientist Elizabeth Wheeler describes how her group is using biology, 3D bioprinting, microchips and other technology to recreate human physiology outside the body. Recorded on 02/13/2016.

Todd P. Coleman of the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering discusses multi-disciplinary efforts to develop noninvasive tools to monitor health status. He shares novel ways of interpreting the collected data for prediction, diagnosis, and prevention of disease, with a particular focus on chronic disease management and healthy aging, as well as the ethics of data collection, privacy, and assessment methods.

Veteran labor activist Dolores Huerta joins food journalist Rose Hayden-Smith and others for an animated discussion on why food insecurity still exists in many communities and what is being done to increase access to healthy, organic food. Farmers, healthcare providers and urban planners bring their insights to this conversation as they share stories of connecting people with the food they need to thrive. This program is the fifth in a Future Thought Leaders series on food sustainability presented by the Berry Good Food Foundation. Convened by BGFF Founder Michelle Ciccarelli Lerach, speakers include Daron "Farmer D" Joffe of Coastal Roots Farm, Dave Murphy of Food Democracy Now!, Paul Watson of the Global Action Research Center, Fernando Sañudo of the Vista Community Clinic and Jillian Barber of Sharp HealthCare.

A vast majority of the newly discovered human pathogens are viruses that have jumped to humans from an animal host ("cross-species transmission"). Find out how biologists and computer scientists have collaborated and used cutting edge ultra-deep sequencing technology to study the dynamics of a 2009 rabies outbreak to better understand emergent viruses, such as Ebola and Zika.

Treating depression can be a slow process. Even after pinpointing the correct medication, it can still take weeks to take effect. Abraham A. Palmer, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair for Basic Research in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Diego joins our host Dr. David Granet to discuss his work uncovering of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of depression. Dr. Palmer and his team are exploring how inhibiting the Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) enzyme can reduce signs of depression. He explains the science behind the discovery and the implications for new, faster-acting treatments.

Although Internet-of-Things (IoT) have their roots in ideas that are decades old, it is a hot topic these days causing both excitement and concern. Proponents see traffic flowing more smoothly, electric grids operating efficiently, environmental sensing, and monitoring health. On the other hand, there are a range of security and privacy concerns that need to be addressed. Margaret Martonosi, Computer Science at Princeton, discusses key technology and policy challenges for future IoT applications and devices, and outlines particular technical issues for researchers to address. Recorded on 05/01/2017.

Why medicines aren't equally effective for both men and women. Also, a special report from Sierra Leone about life after the Ebola outbreak. How to tell whether someone is telling the truth. And, deceptive tactics in the animal kingdom.
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