Health and Medicine


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Recent technology has made our lives much brighter, longer, fuller and healthier than ever before; but how can we ensure that we're not drowning in information and still have offline lives as well? In an interview with UC San Diego's Peter Gourevitch, essayist and novelist Pico Iyer draws upon 40 years of travel across five continents to explore how to make the most of new opportunities, without being depleted -- or devoured -- by them. This program is presented by the Helen Edison Lecture Series at UC San Diego.

Helping patients and their families while conducting research to better understand and treat the disease are the goals of UC San Diego's Huntington's program. Dr. Jody Corey-Bloom explains.

People often think about chronic pain as only benefitting from medical treatment and interventions. Jessica Pullins focuses on an essential strategy for lowering pain-related distress: being "unsympathetic." In this case, "unsympathetic" refers to the Sympathetic Nervous System, the part of the Autonomic Nervous System responsible for the Fight or Flight (or Freeze) Response. Recorded on 02/18/2016.

An X-ray for a broken bone may have been your introduction to the world of radiology but did you know it is one of the most cutting-edge fields in medicine? From CT scans to ultrasounds, radiologists are studying the body in new ways to quickly diagnose and treat a myriad of conditions. Alexander Norbash, MD, MS, Professor and Chair of Radiology at the UC San Diego School of Medicine joins host David Granet, MD to discuss the changing role of the radiologist and how innovative techniques can impact your health.

In his new book, Spitting in the Soup: Inside the Dirty Game of Doping in Sports, UC San Diego alumnus and sports journalist Mark Johnson traces the doping culture in professional sports, from the early days when pills meant progress, to the current day, when athletes are vilified for the use of performance-enhancing drugs. In his book, Johnson, who has covered cycling as a writer and photographer since the 1980s, explores the complex relationships that underlie elite sports culture.

Cellular modeling may hold the key to unlocking some the most important questions about autism. Alysson R. Muotri, PhD joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to explain how his work is shedding light on not only the pathology of autism but potential new drugs.

Phyllis Ferrell, Vice President and Global Development Leader for Alzheimer's Disease at Eli Lilly and Company joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about the goal set forth in the National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease to "prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025." Ferrell's shares her work to make Alzheimer's dementia preventable by finding ways to slow disease progression and advocating for early diagnosis. Recorded on 12/8/2016.

Orthopedic clinical specialist Wendy Katzman looks at avoiding fractures in older age with a focus on skeletal health. Recorded on 05/30/2017.

If you are hiking, skiing, climbing or just visiting at altitude higher than 8,000 feet you may experience altitude sickness. Emergency Medicine specialist Dr. Chris Colwell covers the symptoms and what you should do if you show any of the signs. Recorded on 04/26/2017.

Our neurons talk to each other but the language they use can change depending on what is happening in the environment around them. If the brain can adapt to our world in this way, what are the bigger implications? Nick Spitzer, Division of Biological Sciences, UC San Diego, explains neurotransmitter switching and how that process impacts our physical abilities, disease processes, and more.

Chris Freise, MD. Transplant surgeon, UCSF. Recorded on 05/19/2017.

Hollis King and Michael Kurisu, both osteopathic physicians (DO's) at UC San Diego, describe how osteopathy is a hands-on medical treatment that focuses on the structure and function of the whole body, not just symptoms of disease or pain. As they explain to host Paul J. Mills, doctors of osteopathy learn the same curriculum as traditional medical students, but they approach their patients with a more integrative philosophy of healthcare.

The best-selling author and UCSF endocrinologist Dr. Robert Lustig explores how industry has contributed to a culture of addiction, depression and chronic disease. Always provocative, Lustig reveals the science that drive these states of mind and offers solutions we can use.

From self-described army brat to a renowned physician and scientist, Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo's career success is due in part to her many interests and her ability to pursue a job in which she could thrive. Her thoughts apply to anyone committed to hard work and a balanced life, no matter the field. In this conversation with Dr. Robert Wachter, Chair of the UCSF Department of Medicine, we learn how she is helping to shape healthcare through her work both at UCSF and as the immediate past-chair of the US Preventive Services Task Force, which makes evidence-based recommendations about services such as screenings, counseling services, and preventive medications.

From a small town in South Carolina to joining UCSF as chair of the Department of Medicine in 1964, Lloyd "Holly" Smith helped transform UCSF into a leader in research, medical education and patient care. Dr. Smith has earned many honors and had a lasting impact on UCSF. He reflects on his career and the challenges of shaking up the status quo with Dr. Robert Wachter, Chair of the UCSF Department of Medicine. Recorded on 08/11/2017.

Clinical psychologist Erik Groessl talks about research showing the value of yoga in reducing pain, improving physical function and overcoming opioid addiction in military veterans, among other patients, in this conversation with Paul J. Mills of UC San Diego.

A panel of experts in health policy and women's health programs discuss how maternal and child health care, family planning and reproductive health services may be affected by potential changes coming out of Washington both through the American Health Care Act (AHCA) and administrative actions. Recorded on 07/19/2017.

All healthcare systems must strike a delicate balance between cost, quality and access. Though Obamacare focused largely on increasing access to coverage and spreading the cost of illness across the entire population, Trumpcare tips the balance largely in favor of reducing federal spending, at the risk of destabilizing insurance markets and increasing costs for older and sicker individuals. What would it take to create a healthcare system that would provide future generations with accessible, affordable care? Can this be done while also covering the sick and the underserved? Join the conversation with a panel of government, policy and legal experts. Recorded on 08/03/2017.
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