Health and Medicine


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It's possible to be well-fed, but undernourished. Chris Kresser talks about the principles of supplementation and what you should consider. Recorded on 02/27/2018.

Delve into the realms of predatory superbugs with infectious disease epidemiologist Steffanie Strathdee and her husband, psychologist Thomas Patterson. This is an incredible story of Strathdee's fight to save her husband's life, which led her to rediscover a forgotten treatment for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This unprecedented treatment saved Patterson's life as well as several others and helped launch the Center for Innovative Phage Applications and Therapeutics (IPATH) at UC San Diego, the first phage therapy center in North America. Recorded on 03/05/2019.

Monitoring insulin and glucose for diabetics has come along way. Find out what's new from connected devices to closed loop insulin delivery and continuous glucose monitors. Recorded on 03/13/2019.

Tony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD describes his lab's efforts to use mouse and IPSC models to find commonalities that give insight into the complex disorder of autism.

Research imaging studies, including MRI and CT scans, may provide different information than the imaging performed for clinical care. For instance, a liver MRI using research sequences could be more sensitive at detecting tumors than a standard study. As a result, a patient might no longer qualify for surgery according to the research study. However, information derived from research sequences may not be clinically accurate. Hence the need to conduct a thorough investigation and compare against a gold standard (e.g. a surgical result). Kathryn Fowler, MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Radiology at UC San Diego discuses the ethics of patients and physicians being made aware of research results if they are not verifiably accurate.

National and UCSF leaders discuss reproductive health and justice and the response to increasingly extreme abortion restrictions sweeping the country. This panel focuses on the national perspective on threats and opportunities for abortion access moderated by Daniel Grossman, Director, Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health. Panelists: Renee Bracey Sherman, Senior Public Affairs Manager, National Network of Abortion Funds; Erin Grant, Deputy Director, Abortion Care Network; Stephanie Toti, Senior Counsel & Project Director, The Lawyering Project. Recorded on 06/06/2019.

National and UCSF leaders discuss reproductive health and justice and the response to increasingly extreme abortion restrictions sweeping the country. This panel focuses on the role of an academic medical center in a haven state. Recorded on 06/06/2019.

Marius Wernig, MD, PhD, discusses how his lab has worked to convert non-neuronal cell types (lymphocytes, pluripotent stem cells, fibroblasts, hepatocytes, lymphocytes) to neurons. The lab is now working on identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying induced lineage fate changes, the phenotypic consequences of disease-causing mutations in human neurons and other neural lineages.

Bones are dynamic and continue to rebuild themselves, even as we age. Bone remodeling is supported by a healthy diet and by regular physical activity. Join Vicky Newman, MS, RDN to learn more about dietary choices that help calcium stay in our bones and out of our blood vessels to support both bone strength and arterial flexibility. Adequate calcium, vitamin D, vitamin K, and several trace minerals are all important, as is enough protein and alkaline minerals like magnesium. Our food, supplement, and activity choices help protect bone strength and structural flexibility to help prevent injury and speed healing.

Dr. Dan Lowenstein is UCSF's Vice Chancellor and Provost. In this interview, he describes his circuitous path to a career in medicine, his passion for social justice, and the importance of authenticity for leaders. Lowenstein is an accomplished physician-scientist in the area of epilepsy, an award-winning medical educator, and an innovative and forward-thinking leader. In prior roles, he helped launch UCSF's Academy of Medical Educators, led UCSF's Physician-Scientist training programs, and served as Dean for Education of Harvard Medical School. As UCSF's provost, he oversees the university's academic programs and is taking a leading role in issues ranging from the modernization of the Parnassus Heights campus to the future of big data in healthcare. Recorded on 08/09/2019.

Was the oven turned off? Did I remember to lock the door? Many people have panicky thoughts like that, and even an urge to go back and check. But in some people, these fears go deeper and develop into what's known as obsessive-compulsive disorder. They experience recurring compulsions every day and repeat actions over and over uncontrollably. Also, hernias, halitosis and mosquito bites.

As brain organoids become more widely used in research, concerns about the development of consciousness arise. Christof Koch discusses how we determine and define consciousness and how we look for the underlying physical signatures of consciousness. Recorded on 10/04/2019.
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