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Can we turn off the genes responsible for neurodegenerative diseases? Designer DNA drugs are making this possible. By identifying and targeting the genes that drive disease, scientists are moving closer to treatments for ALS, Huntington's disease, and more. Don W. Cleveland, PhD, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, UC San Diego joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about how these drugs work and how they will impact patient care.

Clinical psychologist Erik Groessl talks about research showing the value of yoga in reducing pain, improving physical function and overcoming opioid addiction in military veterans, among other patients, in this conversation with Paul J. Mills of UC San Diego.

Where does the line in digital ethics reside? As the number of social media users grows, so does the amount of data generated. This user-generated data includes sensitive and private details about people's daily lives. The details can be used to uncover valuable information about trends in human behavior. As these social and technological spheres converge, ethical concerns about the manner in which the data are collected, analyzed, and ultimately used and disseminated by companies, researchers, and the government arise. Tim K. Mackey, MAS, PhD highlights some of these challenges from the perspective of a researcher exploring the social media risk environment for prescription drug abuse.

Jean C. Robertson, Chief of Special Education Services, Chief of Special Education Services, San Francisco Unified School District.

In the United States, privacy is considered a fundamental right. Yet today our activities are followed to a degree unfathomable not long ago by way of cell phones, online behaviors, and more. As genomic technologies continue to expand, another avenue now exists by which we may potentially be scrutinized: DNA sequence. Our genetic information contains our most private details, but we leave it everywhere and share the sequence closely with dozens or even hundreds of relatives. Laura Rivard, PhD, professor of biology at the University of San Diego, discusses ways in which our DNA may "escape" from our control, what can actually be done with the sequence, and whether there is cause for concern.

E-cigarettes have become popular and widely used so fast that the safety testing on them is practically non-existent. While researchers rush to define the toxicities and potential health effects of e-cigarettes, should we be advising everyone against these nicotine delivery devices? Or should we try to be positive and hopeful, in case e-cigarettes have fewer adverse health effects relative to conventional tobacco cigarettes, and thus advise current smokers to switch to e-cigs as a harm reduction strategy? Beyond that, what are the risks of the different e-cig flavors and types of devices? Is vaping caffeine and THC more or less dangerous than vaping nicotine? What are the specific dangers of e-cig use for children, teenagers and young adults? Laura E. Crotty Alexander, MD examines the evolution of e-cigarettes and and shares a physician's view.

Kawasaki Disease is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in the developed world, but it is often misdiagnosed. Without proper treatment, 1 in 4 children will develop irreversible and potentially fatal heart damage. In this episode of Health Matters, leading Kawasaki Disease researcher Dr. Jane C. Burns explains the signs parents should be able to recognize.

Dr. Dan Lowenstein is UCSF's Vice Chancellor and Provost. In this interview, he describes his circuitous path to a career in medicine, his passion for social justice, and the importance of authenticity for leaders. Lowenstein is an accomplished physician-scientist in the area of epilepsy, an award-winning medical educator, and an innovative and forward-thinking leader. In prior roles, he helped launch UCSF's Academy of Medical Educators, led UCSF's Physician-Scientist training programs, and served as Dean for Education of Harvard Medical School. As UCSF's provost, he oversees the university's academic programs and is taking a leading role in issues ranging from the modernization of the Parnassus Heights campus to the future of big data in healthcare. Recorded on 08/09/2019.

A major ambition of artificial intelligence lies in translating patient data to successful therapies. Machine learning models face particular challenges in biomedicine, however, including handling of extreme data heterogeneity and lack of mechanistic insight into predictions. Trey Ideker, PhD argues for "visible" approaches that guide model structure with experimental biology.

Renter's incomes have not caught up to housing costs adding to the causes of homelessness. Dr. Josh Bamberger, Associate Director, UCSF Benioff Homelessness and Housing Initiative, discusses what we know about the homeless population and solutions available. Recorded on 02/20/2020.

1 in 9 US households are food insecure. Dr. Hilary Seligman looks at the impact of food insecurity on health across the lifespan. Food insecurity and health are tightly connected. SNAP reduces food insecurity and also the health impacts of food insecurity. Proposed reductions to SNAP benefits are likely to result in poorer health and increased health care expenditures. Recorded on 03/12/2020.

Limited medical equipment on space craft makes medical care in space a real challenge. Ordinary problems must be dealt with, as well as problems related to the unique environment of space. As NASA plans for new crewed exploration missions, beyond low earth orbit, telemedicine support will be limited, and medical evacuation to earth will no longer be possible. To address this problem, LLNL and NASA Ames Research Center are developing a novel diagnostic instrument to help provide medical care on deep space missions. The technology consists of a blood analysis system, based on microfluidics, together with a breath analysis system that uses carbon nanotube sensors. The technology is designed to support future missions to the moon and Mars, and it is expected to be used for terrestrial medicine as well, in a variety of arenas where medical resources are limited.

Infectious diseases have profound influences on the evolution of their host populations. In the case of humans, the host species has also shaped pathogen dynamics and virulence viaa multitude of factors from changes in social organization, group size, and exploitation of varied habitats and their animals and plant resources to agriculture, technology, rapid long-distance travel, medicine and global economic integration - which all continue to shape epidemics and the humanhost populations. This symposium will explore how infectious agents and humans have shaped each other over the eons.

Infectious diseases have profound influences on the evolution of their host populations. In the case of humans, the host species has also shaped pathogen dynamics and virulence viaa multitude of factors from changes in social organization, group size, and exploitation of varied habitats and their animals and plant resources to agriculture, technology, rapid long-distance travel, medicine and global economic integration - which all continue to shape epidemics and the humanhost populations. This symposium will explore how infectious agents and humans have shaped each other over the eons.

COVID-19 has caused feelings of uncertainty, anxiety, and even anger. What are effective tools to deal with your emotions during these difficult times? Shelli Kurth and Nicole Assisi will show you how to create space for self care for both you and your child. Learn how to be present as well as how to leverage movement to help your child engage in learning.

A team of UCSF scientists discuss their groundbreaking blueprint that reveals how COVID-19 hijacks human cells and identifies drug compounds with antiviral activity that target key proteins in these cells. Their research makes predictions about drugs and compounds that could be repurposed to fight the virus.
Recorded on 05/06/2020.

Doctors and scientists around the globe are tirelessly working to end the COVID-19 pandemic. David "Davey" Smith, MD outlines the keys to survival including testing to know where the pathogen is, treating those who have it, and developing vaccines to protect those at risk.
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