Health and Medicine


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Computer scientist Larry Smarr and osteopathic physician Michael Kurisu present a vision for healthcare that combines the best of allopathic and osteopathic medicine by using a more personalized, hands-on, systems-based approach to treating patients. They demonstrate this proof of concept with details on how Smarr diagnosed his own Crohn's disease by using blood and stool tests to track changes in his body. And when the symptoms became too severe, Smarr collaborated with his surgeon, Sonia Ramamoorthy, MD, to plan the operation based on 3D images of his organs created at his research institute, Calit2 at UC San Diego. Kurisu then introduces Project Apollo, a group of patients inspired by Smarr who are collecting their own data to develop personalized treatments for their particular conditions.

The quality of life is as important as the quantity. Eli Puterman explores the health benefits of physical activity. Any exercise matters but more is better.

In collaboration with the UC San Diego Center for Integrative Nutrition, the Berry Good Food Foundation convenes a panel of experts to discuss the rise of comprehensive medicine and nutritional healing to treat chronic disease and maintain general well-being.

Kara Chien, JD. Managing Attorney, Mental Health Unit, Office of the Public Defender of San Francisco. Recorded on 03/08/2018.

Yvonne Wu, MD, MPH. Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics, UCSF School of Medicine Recorded on 03/09/2018.

Student advocates from across the UC system join the 2018 UC Global Health Day to describe efforts on their respective campuses to collaborate with faculty, campus global health groups, and each other in support of global health. Current proposed cuts to the global health budget threaten the health of communities both globally and locally. The UCGHI Advocacy Initiative helps ensure student, faculty, and community voices are heard throughout California and in Washington, D.C. by coordinating campus events and outreach to members of Congress and other elected officials. Recorded on 04/22/2018.

There are different types of genetic influences on people's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Douglas Galasko, MD, of the UCSD Shiley-Marcos Alzheimer's Disease Research Center joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to discuss these genes, how they are being studied, and what being a carrier of Alzheimer's associated genes means. Learn more about penetrance and expressivity, genome-wide association studies, and more.

Five myths about aging are debunked: Older people are either super healthy or super frail; You are completely responsible for how well you age; Older people will eventually lose their memory; Most older people will end up in nursing homes; There is nothing to look forward to in older age. Recorded on 05/24/2018.

One of the paths to healthy aging includes connecting with peers and building friendships. UCSF's Dr. Carla Perissinotto reviews the concepts of loneliness and social isolation; describe the effects of loneliness and connections on health, and discuss framework for maintaining connections and addressing loneliness. Then, Amber Carroll talks about the connections programs Well Connected and Social Call. Recorded on 06/21/2018.

California State Assembly Member David Chiu, representing the 17th Assembly District, discusses the future of health policy in California. Moderated by Dr. Andrew Bindman UCSF Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Professor of Health Policy at the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies at UCSF. Presented by the UCSF Students for a National Health Program (SNaHP). Recorded on 05/02/2018.

Across the tree of life, we can trace cancer vulnerabilities back to the origins of multicellularity. Cancer is observed in almost all multicellular phyla, including lineages leading to plants, fungi, and animals. However, species vary remarkably in their susceptibility to cancer. Amy Boddy (UCSB Integrated Anthropological Sciences Unit) discusses how this variation in cancer susceptibility is characterized by life history trade-offs, as cancer defense mechanisms are a major component of a body's maintenance. She also looks at how understanding these trade-offs in the context of evolution may help explain the variability we see in cancer susceptibility across human populations. Recorded on 07/18/2018.

Dale Bredesen, MD, UCSF and UCLA, discusses how environmental toxins may lead to Alzheimers disease. Recorded on 09/21/2018.

Hepatitis is inflammation of the liver which can lead to life-threatening liver cell damage. In Good Shape talks to a liver specialist about what causes the illness, and what can be done to prevent it. We also take a look at the practice of freezing unwanted body fat away - who is it good for and how does it work? And we learn about the skin disease rosacea - what can be done to treat it?
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