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In this episode of Recipes for Change, Fiji's favorite chef, Lance Seeto, discovers how prolonged drought is threatening taro - Tonga's staple ingredient - when he joins a local farmer to cook Luu Ika (tuna with taro leaves).

Karen Ross, Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, discusses the future of food and public policy in California and around the world at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Secretary Ross covers everything from the challenges of water management in the face of climate change, to reforming United States immigration policy to benefit farmers, farm workers, and the country as a whole. Recorded on 9/05/2018.

Race, gender, and union-busting violence all arise in this discussion of Debra Kopple's iconic Harlan County, USA. Documentarian Betsy Taylor and historian Alice O'Connor (UC Santa Barbara) offer expert perspectives into connections between events and figures in Kopple's film and broader environmental justice and labor struggles unfolding across the US in the early 1970s. In addition, Taylor's intimate knowledge of this mining area enables her to offer rich detail about the local landscape, corporate land ownership, and crooked politics that form the foundation of this classic documentary. Recorded on 10/16/2018.

Brown v. Board of Education was hailed as a landmark decision for civil rights. But decades later, many consider school integration a failure. UC Berkeley professor Rucker C. Johnson's new book Children of the Dream shows the exact opposite is true. The book looks at decades of studies to show that students of all races who attended integrated schools fared better than those who did not. In this interview with Goldman School of Public Policy Dean Henry E. Brady, Johnson explains how he and his team analyzed the impact of not just integration, but school funding policies, and the Head Start program. Recorded on 1/09/2019.

The Trump Administration has an anti-ISIS military policy but has zeroed out reconstruction support for areas that have been liberated from ISIS in Syria. It has an anti-Iranian policy both rhetorically and economically, but it leaves containing the spread of Iran and the Shia militias in Syria to Israel and to the Russians and leaves Israel on its own to deal with the Russians. It has declared it will present a peace plan for the Israelis and Palestinians but at this point is unable to deal directly with the Palestinian Authority. In all these areas, there are elements of a policy but inconsistencies as well. The gap between objectives and means remains wide. Can it be bridged? Will we see an effective strategy for the area? And, what would an effective strategy look like? Dennis Ross will cover all this in his lecture. Recorded on 10/21/2018.

Women played a huge role in the 2018 midterms. A record number of women were elected to congress, some marking other historic firsts along the way. Women organized massive rallies, and made their voices heard at the polls. So, what can we expect in 2020 and beyond? Former Governor of Michigan Jennifer Granholm and UC Berkeley Public Policy professor Sarah Anzia sit down with PhD student Charlotte Hill to discuss how they see women shaping the future of politics in the United States.

This panel focuses on questions around policing in Latinx communities in order to shed light on the ways that intersecting legal regimes and policing practices affect those communities. The panel explores the heavy police presence in public schools that serve this community and considers the ways that interoperable information systems and data sharing practices are used. Finally, the panel examines the effects of policing practices at the intersection of immigration law and criminal law that disproportionately target the Latinx community. Moderator: Jennifer Chacón, UCLA School of Law. Panelists: Kevin Johnson, UC Davis School of Law; Julia Mendoza, Stanford Law School; Ana Muñiz, UCI School of Social Ecology; Amada Armenta, UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs.

This panel explores the relevance of race, citizenship, immigration status, and community context in explaining lethal violence and criminal case outcomes, both currently and historically. Drawing from a variety of data sources and employing a wide range of analytical approaches, the panel illuminates largely overlooked and underappreciated racially-contingent micro- and meso-level processes and their enduring consequences for Latinx defendants, Latinx victims, and Latinx communities. Moderator: Alicia Virani, UCLA School of Law. Panelists: Klara Stephens, University of Michigan Law School/ National Registry of Exonerations; Cynthia Willis-Esqueda, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Jeffrey Ulmer, Penn State; Ramiro Martinez, Northeastern University

The American energy system is in transition away from coal and toward less carbon intensive fuels, such as natural gas and wind. Energy produced by renewables and gas is projected to grow by 10 quadrillion BTUs over the next two decades, while other sources will remain constant or decline. Such a rapid transition requires construction of new facilities for generating and transmitting energy. Stephen Ansolabehere, Professor of Government at Harvard, tells the story of recent energy development efforts across the United States and the lessons for the transition toward a less carbon intensive energy system. Recorded on 01/16/2019.

Marion Nestle (NYU) and Laura Schmidt (UCSF) discuss nutrition policy and research, scientific conflicts of interest, the upcoming Dietary Guidelines, global food systems and more in this conversation about the food industry's influence on scientific research. Recorded on 02/07/2019.

Undermining widely held beliefs about the black-Jewish alliance, Marc Dollinger, Professor of Jewish Studies at San Francisco State University, describes a new political consensus, based on identity politics, that drew blacks and Jews together and altered the course of American liberalism. Dollinger's most recent book takes a new and different look at Jewish involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, showing how American Jews leveraged the Black Power movement to increase Jewish ethnic and religious identity in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Recorded on 01/14/2019.

"I use art to start conversations about something that is serious and complex." Shaney jo Darden, Founder and Global Creative Chief of The Keep A Breast Foundation, shares her journey in the world of art and activism. As someone who has carved out a career path focused on community and compassion, she stresses the importance discovering your unique talents and finding a place for them in your everyday work. Recorded on 03/12/2019.
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