Public Affairs


New Videos and Podcasts
> more videos and podcasts in Public Affairs
Popular Programs
> more popular programs in Public Affairs
Public Affairs airing this week

Some 300 San Diego Unified high school students learn about STEAM career experiences from five innovators who present new technologies including electric cars, satellites that provide internet connections to airplanes and other moving vehicles, an algae-fueled Baja 1000 motorcycle, and state-of-the art bicycles.

Lynne Kirby, Executive Producer of the National Geographic documentary "Water & Power: A California Heist," discusses the film and the state of water in California with Constance Penley, UCSB Professor of Film & Media Studies. Recorded on 07/13/2017.

Hardly a week goes by without another controversy over free speech on college campuses. On one side, there are increased demands to censor hateful, disrespectful, and bullying expression and to ensure an inclusive and nondiscriminatory learning environment. On the other side are traditional free speech advocates who charge that recent demands for censorship coddle students and threaten free inquiry. UC Irvine Chancellor Howard Gillman is an expert in the American Constitution and the Supreme Court. Here he discusses why campuses must provide supportive learning environments for an increasingly diverse student body but can never restrict the expression of ideas. Recorded on 05/30/2018.

Marion Nestle (NYU) and Laura Schmidt (UCSF) discuss nutrition policy and research, scientific conflicts of interest, the upcoming Dietary Guidelines, global food systems and more in this conversation about the food industry's influence on scientific research. Recorded on 02/07/2019.

Janet Napolitano, the former US Secretary of Homeland Security, discusses her new book, How Safe Are We?: Homeland Security Since 9/11, what we have accomplished since that awful day, where the critical security gaps remain, and where dangerous new ones have opened—and how to close them. While the devastation at Ground Zero is etched in our collective memory as the image of terrorism, the threat landscape has evolved dramatically since the Department of Homeland Security was created in 2003. "Rather than collapsed buildings," Napolitano writes, "today we face collapsed faith in our democratic institutions," caused by cyber-intrusions into US elections and into other areas of critical infrastructure, including our energy, financial and communications networks. Recorded on 04/02/2019.

As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past. In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman's Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. She combines philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories.

By virtually any measure, prisons have not worked. They are sites of cruelty, dehumanization, and violence, as well as subordination by race, class, and gender. Prisons traumatize virtually all who come into contact with them. Abolition of prison could be the ultimate reform. Georgetown Law Professor Paul Bulter explores what would replace prisons, how people who cause harm could be dealt with in the absence of incarceration, and why abolition would make everyone safer and our society more just.

What makes a neighborhood into a community? With rising density in areas like San Diego's East Village, good urban design is more essential than ever for creating vibrant, livable communities. Enjoy a lively discussion about design strategies for urban settings with a special focus on the dog park/dog run as a particularly effective "mixer" for both human and canine interaction. L.A.-based design and architecture guru Frances Anderton of KCRW FM's DnA will guide the conversation with San Diego urban planning mavin Howard Blackson and New York Times best-selling author (and UC San Diego alumna) Alexandra Horowitz, an expert on canine cognition and the human-dog relationship.

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Professor Paul Butler, Albert Brick Professor Law at Georgetown, for a discussion of the law and blacks. Topics covered include formative experiences including influence of his parents, his upbringing in Chicago, his education, and his work as a prosecutor. Emphasis is on how and why his ideas about reform and activism evolved as he came to understand black confrontation with the law.

From highways to trains to housing, where governments spend money can have a major impact on the environment and the economy. Join California State Treasurer Fiona Ma, the Center for Environmental Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy and the Berkeley Forum for a discussion on major finance policy issues facing the State of California, including green bonds and sustainable finance.

Fiona Ma is California's 34th State Treasurer. She was elected on November 6, 2018 with more votes than any other candidate for treasurer in the state's history. She is the first woman of color and the first woman Certified Public Accountant (CPA) elected to the position.

California is the world's fifth-largest economy and Treasurer Ma is the state's primary banker. Her office processes more than $2 trillion in payments within a typical year and provides transparency and oversight for an investment portfolio of more than $90 billion.

Immigrants and refugees represent nearly a fourth of San Diego County - and nearly $20 billion dollars in earning power. Workforce planning and development needs to create strategies to integrate the talent of these individuals into our community and businesses. Dyna R. Jones and Rahmatullah Mokhtar share their stories of finding a place in the workforce.

The truth needs reinforcements. That's the central message of David Barstow's talk at the UC Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy. From fraudulent web sites masquerading as news organizations, to social media, to deepfakes, it has never been easier for bad actors to spread misinformation around the world. Barstow reflects on how economic downturns in journalism and the rise of public relations has compounded the problem, and what can be done to fix it.

Barstow is a former senior writer at The New York Times and the first reporter to ever win four Pulitzer Prizes, is the head of investigative reporting at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism. Named the Reva and David Logan Distinguished Chair in Investigative Journalism in July 2019, Barstow joined The Times in 1999 and he has been a member of the paper's Investigative unit since 2002. Recorded on 11/13/2019.
Sign up for UCSD-TV's monthly e-newsletter:
contact
contact info

feedback

press

watch
tv schedule

where to watch

videos & podcasts

more info
about ucsd-tv

ucsd-tv blog

university of california, san diego

follow



©2017 Regents of the University of California. All right reserved. Terms and Conditions of Use.