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In his book, Anatomy of Malice: The Enigma of the Nazi War Criminals, author Joel Dimsdale draws on decades of experience as a psychiatrist and the dramatic advances within psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience since the Nuremberg Trials to take a fresh look at four Nazi war criminals: Robert Ley, Hermann Goring, Julius Streicher and Rudolf Hess. Dimsdale, an emeritus professor of psychiatry at UC San Diego, is presented by the UC San Diego Library.

Author and anti-racist activist Tim Wise speaks about the importance of being a white ally to communities of color, and how we can all work together to create a healthier community on campuses and in the world beyond. Wise spoke as part of UCSB's Resilient Love in a Time of Hate series. Recorded on 01/25/2017.

Author and Boston University law professor Pnina Lahav discusses her forthcoming biography, "Golda Meir: Through the Gender Lens." She explores the first and only woman prime minister of Israel, and her complex relationship with her role as a female leader in a man's world. During the course of her legal career, Pnina Lahav has published nearly 50 journal articles and three books, including the critically acclaimed 'Judgment in Jerusalem: Chief Justice Simon Agranat and the Zionist Century'. Recorded on 11/12/2017.

Behavioral economist Elizabeth Linos talks about how to implement good public policy by focusing on needs of the people who serve in government. In this conversation with Henry E. Brady, Dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, Linos argues that diversity in recruitment leads to better outcomes, particularly in law enforcement, and that burnout can be avoided if staffers are appropriately supported in their work environments.

E.J. Dionne writes about politics in a twice-weekly column for the Washington Post, and is a government professor at Georgetown University, a visiting professor at Harvard University, a senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution. He is a frequent commentator on politics for National Public Radio.

Before joining The Post in 1990 as a political reporter, Dionne spent 14 years at The New York Times, where he covered politics and reported from Albany, Washington, Paris, Rome and Beirut. His coverage of the Vatican was described by the Los Angeles Times as the best in two decades. In 2014-2015, Dionne was the vice president of the American Political Science Association. Recorded on 02/20/2019.

Celebrating and honoring the legacy of Sally Ride, the first American woman to fly in space, Women in Leadership brings together trailblazers who have shattered barriers and paved the way for women across the globe. Through a candid and timely discussion, the distinguished panel will share their personal stories and vision on how women can help lead our nation to a better future.

The American energy system is in transition away from coal and toward less carbon intensive fuels, such as natural gas and wind. Energy produced by renewables and gas is projected to grow by 10 quadrillion BTUs over the next two decades, while other sources will remain constant or decline. Such a rapid transition requires construction of new facilities for generating and transmitting energy. Stephen Ansolabehere, Professor of Government at Harvard, tells the story of recent energy development efforts across the United States and the lessons for the transition toward a less carbon intensive energy system. Recorded on 01/16/2019.

Janet Napolitano, the former US Secretary of Homeland Security, discusses her new book, How Safe Are We?: Homeland Security Since 9/11, what we have accomplished since that awful day, where the critical security gaps remain, and where dangerous new ones have opened—and how to close them. While the devastation at Ground Zero is etched in our collective memory as the image of terrorism, the threat landscape has evolved dramatically since the Department of Homeland Security was created in 2003. "Rather than collapsed buildings," Napolitano writes, "today we face collapsed faith in our democratic institutions," caused by cyber-intrusions into US elections and into other areas of critical infrastructure, including our energy, financial and communications networks. Recorded on 04/02/2019.

Inspired to fight poverty in the Bay Area, Goldman School of Public Policy Alumnus Daniel Lurie (MPP '05) founded Tipping Point in 2005. Since then, Tipping Point has raised more than $200 million to educate, employ, house and support those in need in the Bay Area. In the last year alone, the organization has helped put 21,000 people on a path out of poverty through a combination of grantmaking, grantee support, corporate philanthropy, policy and research. Recorded on 04/09/2019.

Quality data is paramount to ensuring equal representation. If we don't know who is living in our communities, we can't create and maintain the systems needed to care for and support those people. In this panel discussion, experts on data collection, Chicano studies and urban planning discuss the challenges of getting good data, and how to turn data into action. This panel was part of a day long symposium celebrating the life and legacy of Leo Estrada, who spent 40-years at the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA.

National and UCSF leaders discuss reproductive health and justice and the response to increasingly extreme abortion restrictions sweeping the country. This panel focuses on the national perspective on threats and opportunities for abortion access moderated by Daniel Grossman, Director, Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health. Panelists: Renee Bracey Sherman, Senior Public Affairs Manager, National Network of Abortion Funds; Erin Grant, Deputy Director, Abortion Care Network; Stephanie Toti, Senior Counsel & Project Director, The Lawyering Project. Recorded on 06/06/2019.

National and UCSF leaders discuss reproductive health and justice and the response to increasingly extreme abortion restrictions sweeping the country. This panel focuses on the role of an academic medical center in a haven state. Recorded on 06/06/2019.

Five leaders from the world of impact investing who focus on early stage ventures that create meaningful social and environmental value discuss what it means to invest for good. Panel: Lewam Kefela, Investor at VilCap Investments; Noushin Ketabi, Founder of Vega Coffee; Nancy Swanson, Executive Director of Linked Foundation; Julia Sze, Impact Investment Strategy Advisor. Keynote Speaker: Kat Taylor, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Radicle Impact. Recorded on 05/07/2019.
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