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Learn about employers that are transforming hiring practices, building inclusive communities and providing a pathway for young people to succeed. Like-minded businesses and community-based organizations discuss building a new approach to youth development and economic mobility. Recorded on 04/12/2018.

It is widely held today on grounds of prudence if not realism that in designing public policy and legal systems, we should assume that people are entirely self-interested and amoral. But it is anything but prudent to let "Economic Man" be the behavioral assumption that underpins public policy. Samuel Bowles (Santa Fe Institute) supports his position using evidence from behavioral experiments mechanism design and other sources, and proposes an alternative paradigm for policy making. Recorded on 02/25/2019.

Brown v. Board of Education was hailed as a landmark decision for civil rights. But decades later, many consider school integration a failure. UC Berkeley professor Rucker C. Johnson's new book Children of the Dream shows the exact opposite is true. The book looks at decades of studies to show that students of all races who attended integrated schools fared better than those who did not. In this interview with Goldman School of Public Policy Dean Henry E. Brady, Johnson explains how he and his team analyzed the impact of not just integration, but school funding policies, and the Head Start program. Recorded on 1/09/2019.

The Trump Administration has an anti-ISIS military policy but has zeroed out reconstruction support for areas that have been liberated from ISIS in Syria. It has an anti-Iranian policy both rhetorically and economically, but it leaves containing the spread of Iran and the Shia militias in Syria to Israel and to the Russians and leaves Israel on its own to deal with the Russians. It has declared it will present a peace plan for the Israelis and Palestinians but at this point is unable to deal directly with the Palestinian Authority. In all these areas, there are elements of a policy but inconsistencies as well. The gap between objectives and means remains wide. Can it be bridged? Will we see an effective strategy for the area? And, what would an effective strategy look like? Dennis Ross will cover all this in his lecture. Recorded on 10/21/2018.

California reached its goal of reducing emissions to 1990 levels four years ahead of the 2020 target date. Robert Epstein, co-founder of Environmental Entrepreneurs, takes a look at what is and is not working as we plan for an additional 40% reduction by 2030. He also examines California's role in reducing worldwide emissions in both developing and developed countries.

National health policy expert Drew Altman presents an analysis of the public's priorities and opinions in health care as the new Congress takes shape and the 2020 presidential campaign begins. Recorded on 01/23/2019.

This panel explores how statewide direct democracy measures, including ballot initiatives, have propelled affirmative criminal justice reforms in jurisdictions with large Latinx populations. Panelists discuss the ways in which Latinx people were and were not meaningfully incorporated into the campaigns and subsequent implementation efforts for Florida's Amendment 4, California's Propositions 47 and 57, and a handful of drug referendums. This discussion focuses on lessons learned and highlight best practices as they relate to the ballot box and criminal justice reform. Ultimately, this discussion informs the capacity for meaningful reforms to integrate the needs of the Latinx community, including the potential for scale in other jurisdictions with large Latinx populations, like Arizona. Moderator: Sonja Diaz, UCLA Luskin School of Public Policy. Panelists: Tomas Robles, LUCHA; Juan Cartagena, LatinoJustice PRDLEF; Marisa Arrona, Californians for Safety and Justice.

This panel explores the relevance of race, citizenship, immigration status, and community context in explaining lethal violence and criminal case outcomes, both currently and historically. Drawing from a variety of data sources and employing a wide range of analytical approaches, the panel illuminates largely overlooked and underappreciated racially-contingent micro- and meso-level processes and their enduring consequences for Latinx defendants, Latinx victims, and Latinx communities. Moderator: Alicia Virani, UCLA School of Law. Panelists: Klara Stephens, University of Michigan Law School/ National Registry of Exonerations; Cynthia Willis-Esqueda, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Jeffrey Ulmer, Penn State; Ramiro Martinez, Northeastern University

Marion Nestle (NYU) and Laura Schmidt (UCSF) discuss nutrition policy and research, scientific conflicts of interest, the upcoming Dietary Guidelines, global food systems and more in this conversation about the food industry's influence on scientific research. Recorded on 02/07/2019.
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