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The Moment in Time documents the uncertain days of the beginning of World War II when it was feared the Nazis were developing the atomic bomb. The history of the bomb's development is traced through recollections of those who worked on what was known as "the gadget."

On this edition of Computing Primetime Ravi Ramamoorthi, director of the new UC San Diego Center for Visual Computing - or VisComp - is joined by two other faculty members on the interdisciplinary roster of UC San Diego researchers in the center: Cognitive Science professor Zhuowen Tu, and Qualcomm Institute research scientist Jurgen Schulze, who also teaches computer graphics in the Computer Science and Engineering department. In a wide-ranging conversation they discuss the three grand research themes that underpin VisComp activities: Mobile visual computing and digital imaging to capture, process and display the visual world with smartphones and other devices; Interactive digital (augmented) reality to allow us to render and mix real and virtual content seamlessly and realistically in real time, and the ability to automate computer-based visual understanding of the world from small-scale underwater organisms to large cities.

Ellen Williams, Director, ARPA-E, U.S. Department of Energy provides an interesting look at the kinds of advanced projects supported by the US Department of Energy. Recorded on 10/27/2015.

Can we turn off the genes responsible for neurodegenerative diseases? Designer DNA drugs are making this possible. By identifying and targeting the genes that drive disease, scientists are moving closer to treatments for ALS, Huntington's disease, and more. Don W. Cleveland, PhD, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, UC San Diego joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about how these drugs work and how they will impact patient care.

Where does the line in digital ethics reside? As the number of social media users grows, so does the amount of data generated. This user-generated data includes sensitive and private details about people's daily lives. The details can be used to uncover valuable information about trends in human behavior. As these social and technological spheres converge, ethical concerns about the manner in which the data are collected, analyzed, and ultimately used and disseminated by companies, researchers, and the government arise. Tim K. Mackey, MAS, PhD highlights some of these challenges from the perspective of a researcher exploring the social media risk environment for prescription drug abuse.

In this talk Julian McAuley, UC San Diego Computer Science and Engineering, discusses the modeling techniques behind personalized recommendation technology on the web. Examples of Recommender Systems range from simple statistical approaches like Amazon's people who bought X also bought Y links, to complex AI-based approaches that drive feed ranking on sites like Facebook. We'll discuss the models that drive these systems, look at the research questions that drive the future of this field in the coming years, and discuss their ethical implications.

A detailed overview of a study conducted by Alysson Muotri's lab at the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program which found complex network signaling developing in human cortical organoids that appear to recapitulate fetal brain development, offering an in-vitro model to study functional development of human neuronal networks.

The science of stem cells and how they impact your health.

In the United States, privacy is considered a fundamental right. Yet today our activities are followed to a degree unfathomable not long ago by way of cell phones, online behaviors, and more. As genomic technologies continue to expand, another avenue now exists by which we may potentially be scrutinized: DNA sequence. Our genetic information contains our most private details, but we leave it everywhere and share the sequence closely with dozens or even hundreds of relatives. Laura Rivard, PhD, professor of biology at the University of San Diego, discusses ways in which our DNA may "escape" from our control, what can actually be done with the sequence, and whether there is cause for concern.

A major ambition of artificial intelligence lies in translating patient data to successful therapies. Machine learning models face particular challenges in biomedicine, however, including handling of extreme data heterogeneity and lack of mechanistic insight into predictions. Trey Ideker, PhD argues for "visible" approaches that guide model structure with experimental biology.

One of the top ten science achievements of 2019, Using 3D printing to connect stem-cell derived brain and eye models, and a look at developments in robotics.

New state-of-the-art chronologic measurements of rocks brought to Earth by Apollo astronauts reveal that many of the historical age determinations are erroneous. The new measurements presented by cosmochemist Lars Borg demonstrate that the Moons mantle and crust formed contemporaneously between 4.33 and 4.38 billion years ago.

Limited medical equipment on space craft makes medical care in space a real challenge. Ordinary problems must be dealt with, as well as problems related to the unique environment of space. As NASA plans for new crewed exploration missions, beyond low earth orbit, telemedicine support will be limited, and medical evacuation to earth will no longer be possible. To address this problem, LLNL and NASA Ames Research Center are developing a novel diagnostic instrument to help provide medical care on deep space missions. The technology consists of a blood analysis system, based on microfluidics, together with a breath analysis system that uses carbon nanotube sensors. The technology is designed to support future missions to the moon and Mars, and it is expected to be used for terrestrial medicine as well, in a variety of arenas where medical resources are limited.

Where did we humans come from? When did we become the dominant species on the planet?

Experts take you on an exploration of the last half-decade of new evidence from ancient DNA, fossils, archaeology and population studies that has updated our knowledge about The Origins of Today's Humans.

Recorded on 02/21/2020.

Animals in X-ray films: scientists in Jena get under animals' skins to film their moving skeletons. The dream of fusion: will this technology soon be a feasible source of energy? And: can the laws that hold our world together be overruled? Breaking the laws of physics.

Infectious diseases have profound influences on the evolution of their host populations. In the case of humans, the host species has also shaped pathogen dynamics and virulence viaa multitude of factors from changes in social organization, group size, and exploitation of varied habitats and their animals and plant resources to agriculture, technology, rapid long-distance travel, medicine and global economic integration - which all continue to shape epidemics and the humanhost populations. This symposium will explore how infectious agents and humans have shaped each other over the eons.

Infectious diseases have profound influences on the evolution of their host populations. In the case of humans, the host species has also shaped pathogen dynamics and virulence viaa multitude of factors from changes in social organization, group size, and exploitation of varied habitats and their animals and plant resources to agriculture, technology, rapid long-distance travel, medicine and global economic integration - which all continue to shape epidemics and the humanhost populations. This symposium will explore how infectious agents and humans have shaped each other over the eons.

In the second from the A Deep Look into COVID-19 series, UC San Diego infectious disease researchers provide an overview of the potential for treatments and vaccines for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, cause of COVID-19 disease which is sweeping the globe in a pandemic. They share their expertise in the dynamics of the SARS-CoV-2 host-pathogen interactions, epidemic and pandemic cycles, and pathways to vaccines to respond to this global challenge.

A team of UCSF scientists discuss their groundbreaking blueprint that reveals how COVID-19 hijacks human cells and identifies drug compounds with antiviral activity that target key proteins in these cells. Their research makes predictions about drugs and compounds that could be repurposed to fight the virus.
Recorded on 05/06/2020.
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