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Our bodies are made up of trillions of different types of cells that carry out specific life processes. The way that these cells function is defined by the microscopic complexes contained within, which are smaller than the wavelength of light. Often times, dysfunction of these tiny cellular complexes lead to diseases, such as cancers and neurodegeneration. In this presentation, The Scripps Reasearch Institutes' Gabriel Lander takes you on an exploration of the field of "structural biology", and the use of an important tool that allows us to image the impossibly small nanomachines in our cells, in order to find out how they work and interact with each other.

UC San Diego astrophysicist Brian Keating presents cosmological observations that have revealed a mysterious universe, pointing to the startling possibility that our cosmos might be just the most insignificant speck of what is now called "the Multiverse." New telescopes such as the BICEP based in Antarctica hint at an infinite universe with the possibility of unimaginable fecundity, yet devoid of life other than here on Earth. Keating explores what this implies about free will in an infinite universe, with infinite degrees of freedom and choices.

Animal development is directed by a genetic toolkit shared by all animals from fruit flies to frogs to human beings rather than different animals having different genetic toolkits. UCLA Professor of Biological Chemistry Edward De Robertis explains that the field of evolutionary development (or Evo-Devo) seeks to understand how so many beautiful animal forms evolved through the use of the original genetic toolkit of the last common ancestor of all animals, urbilateria, which existed at least 560 million years ago. Recorded on 10.25.2016.

What are fossil fuels? What is the greenhouse effect? How are the two related? Can we reduce our reliance on fossil fuels and lower the emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere? Wind and solar power can help lead the way. Learn how state-of-the-art science and engineering can be used to utilize more clean, green energy from both the wind and the sun, right out of thin air. Recorded on 2/14/2015.

Why just read about ancient Rome when you can walk the cobbled streets as if you were really there? That's the promise of virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality in today's classrooms. While the idea of strapping on goggles to virtually visit the Colosseum or go inside a molecule sounds like the stuff of science fiction, the technology to do just that is becoming more popular and available every day. Yes, there are plenty of obstacles from cost to teacher training but using virtual reality as an educational tool offers considerable benefits. Not only can it boost visual and technology literacy, but it also improves students' attention and engagement. Learn how this technology has the possibility to transform K-12 education from educators and engineers gathered by UC San Diego. Recorded on 09/13/2017.

Treating depression can be a slow process. Even after pinpointing the correct medication, it can still take weeks to take effect. Abraham A. Palmer, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair for Basic Research in the Department of Psychiatry at UC San Diego joins our host Dr. David Granet to discuss his work uncovering of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of depression. Dr. Palmer and his team are exploring how inhibiting the Glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) enzyme can reduce signs of depression. He explains the science behind the discovery and the implications for new, faster-acting treatments.

Clarissa Anderson, Director of Scripps Oceanography's Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System gives an expert's perspective on the toxic algal blooms that impact life in our coastal ocean. Recorded on 09/11/2017.

Michael Green, neuroscientist and professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA, has been fascinated with the human brain, behavior and mental illness since his undergraduate days. In particular, his research focuses on schizophrenia, a chronic brain disorder that affects about 1 percent of the population. In this UCLA Faculty Research Lecture, he describes how his lab uses discoveries in psychology and social neuroscience about normal brain functioning to inform his schizophrenia research. And now, Green and his colleagues are moving into new territory, studying the causes of social isolation among people who do not have schizophrenia. You'll learn about the tools they use such as functional MRI, that measures and maps brain activity, and EEG, that detects electrical activity in the brain, and how they do research to answer questions about social isolation in the general public. Recorded on 11.06.2017.

Join Scripps Oceanography Green Scholar John Delaney for a deep dive into the profound connections between oceans, human history, and the future of exploration, on earth and other planets. Recorded on 11/13/2017.

The 12th NASA Administrator, Charles F. Bolden Jr. shares how NASA's programs and missions function as an instrument of international cooperation, demonstrating the steady guidance of the United States as the world's leader. Recorded on 10/17/2017.

Today, the IT Industry accounts for about 2 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions, comparable to the footprint of air travel. Will IT emission eclipse air travel one day soon? Urs Hölzle thinks the clear answer is "no": he says IT energy will decrease, and perhaps decrease significantly, over the next decade. Find out why. Hölzle is Senior Vice President of Technical Infrastructure & Google Fellow and oversees the design and operation of the servers, networks, and data centers that power Google's services, as well as the development of the software infrastructure used by Google's applications. Recorded on 10/20/2017.

State-of-the-art imaging at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal scales in rodents and primates are discussed in this symposium, while addressing the challenges of bridging spatial and temporal scales.
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