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Calit Research Scientist and National Geographic Explorer Albert Lin, renowned for his hi-tech search for the tomb of Genghis Khan hosts Ryan Kastner, co-director of UC San Diego's Engineers for Exploration Program in a discussion of the ways computer engineering and computer science are integral to many fields like archaeology that one would never imagine.

Scripps Oceanography welcomes America's newest oceanographic research vessel: R/V Sally Ride. The ship features the most advanced oceanographic research tools available, and is named in honor of America's first woman in space, science advocate, and UC San Diego Professor, Sally Ride. Gain an insider's look at what it takes to design, build, and run one of the most important tools modern day explorers will use to understand and protect the planet. Recorded on 10/10/2016.

Simon Fisher gives a fascinating account of how an irregularity in one single base of DNA leads to a rare and severe inherited language deficit, and how this finding helps reveal aspects of the evolutionary history of the human capacity for language. Recorded on 05/05/2017.

Jamie Ward examines the relationship between autism and synaesthesia, and the characteristics shared by these two cognitive anomalies. Recorded on 05/05/2017.

Our neurons talk to each other but the language they use can change depending on what is happening in the environment around them. If the brain can adapt to our world in this way, what are the bigger implications? Nick Spitzer, Division of Biological Sciences, UC San Diego, explains neurotransmitter switching and how that process impacts our physical abilities, disease processes, and more.

Now that you know how to program a servo take it to the next level and create something fun with a robotic element. Follow along with this step by step guide to high tech crafting.

Seven and a half billion humans are changing the way we relate to the oceans. In this fast-changing world, marine animals and plants must adapt fast to a warmer and corrosive environment as ocean acidification, pollution and deoxygenation continue. This global crisis is causing humans to be anxious about the safety of our oceans for recreation and as a source of food. Debora Iglesias-Rodriguez discusses how humans can contribute to ameliorate current ocean problems and eventually return the oceans to a more sustainable state. Recorded on 07/12/2017.

How often do you wonder about supercomputers and computers that "think" like humans? Supercomputers have been used to model complex scientific phenomena for decades. Now, scientists are entering a new era in computing, and computers are learning in a way that is similar to the human brain. With enough information, computers can learn to solve problems in novel and interesting ways. Specialized computers can even solve these problems using significantly less energy than "classical" computers. This talk describes using supercomputers to solve challenging problems and the evolving technologies of learning systems.

Brian Nosek, co-founder and executive director of the Center for Open Science, outlines the most urgent challenges in achieving a more open science future and how the scholarly communication community can change practices to validate and recognize open research. Nosek, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, is presented by the UC San Diego Library. Recorded on 04.19.2018.

Eytan Elbaz is an American entrepreneur and investor best known for co-founding Applied Semantics. In 2003, Applied Semantics was acquired by Google for $102 million in a deal that included pre-IPO Google company stock. As part of the acquisition, Elbaz served as Head of Domain Channel at Google from 2003 to 2007. Eytan is an Angel investor and founder of many Los Angeles companies, most notably Scopely, a mobile gaming startup. He is also the founder and Chairman of the Board of Render Media, a new-age digital media start up. Recorded on 02/13/2018.

It has been a long-standing challenge to create new technologies that can match the perceptual and movement abilities of the human hand and its sense of touch in robots. Yon Visell describes the work in his lab on haptics, the science and engineering for the sense of touch, and explains how the results are guiding the development of new technologies for wearable computing, and robotics. Recorded on 07/09/2018.

Jack Feldman, a distinguished professor of neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, shares the series of remarkable revelations he has made about breathing and the brain. Recorded on 10/17/2018.

How do you model a disease process that stretches out over 20 years in a way that helps you intervene in that process? In the inaugural Shiley Endowed Lecture, Bradley Hyman, MD, PhD shares his research on the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Scientists are often puzzled when members of the public reject what we consider to be well-founded explanations. They can't understand why the presentation of scientific data and theory doesn't suffice to convince others of the validity of "controversial" topics like evolution and climate change. Eugenie Scott, Founding Executive Director, National Center for Science Education, highlights the importance of ideology in shaping what scientific conclusions are considered reliable and acceptable. This research is quite relevant to the evolution wars and the opposition to climate change, and to other questions of the rejection of empirical evidence. Recorded on 10/03/2018.

Polymers, known colloquially as plastics, abound in the world around us due to a host of useful properties. In this talk, Christopher Bates (UCSB Materials and Chemical Engineering Departments) discusses a fascinating subset of these materials known as block copolymers, which naturally self-assemble into intricate, nanometer-sized patterns. Bates' lab provides a look into the natural universe through the lens of chemistry and materials science. Recorded on 07/02/2018.

Olivier George researches addiction at the Scripps Research Institute. He describes the effects of drugs on the brain, including alcohol, nicotine, cocaine and opioids; why some people, but not others, develop an addiction; and highlights new therapeutic strategies to fight addiction. Recorded on 11/17/2018.
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