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Our bodies are made up of trillions of different types of cells that carry out specific life processes. The way that these cells function is defined by the microscopic complexes contained within, which are smaller than the wavelength of light. Often times, dysfunction of these tiny cellular complexes lead to diseases, such as cancers and neurodegeneration. In this presentation, The Scripps Reasearch Institutes' Gabriel Lander takes you on an exploration of the field of "structural biology", and the use of an important tool that allows us to image the impossibly small nanomachines in our cells, in order to find out how they work and interact with each other.

Scripps Oceanography welcomes America's newest oceanographic research vessel: R/V Sally Ride. The ship features the most advanced oceanographic research tools available, and is named in honor of America's first woman in space, science advocate, and UC San Diego Professor, Sally Ride. Gain an insider's look at what it takes to design, build, and run one of the most important tools modern day explorers will use to understand and protect the planet. Recorded on 10/10/2016.

Just ten years ago, questions about editing genomes of the next human generation were largely hypothetical. The prospect of erasing fatal or debilitating diseases was seen as a goal worth pursuing, even as some worried about the slippery slope of using this technology to create "designer babies." Since then, the science has progressed rapidly. We now have a variety of tools that move these possibilities from theoretical to plausible. Based on his own research, as well as knowledge of the findings of others conducting stem cell research, Evan Y. Snyder, MD, PhD, FAAP will describe some of these tools and lead a discussion addressing key questions such as: Do we want to do this at all? If we are editing human genomes, then should this be done in vitro, in utero, or after birth? Are there some things we should not do? Who decides?

Cerebral organoids, also known as mini-brains, are tridimensional self-organized structures derived from stem cells that resemble the early stages of the human embryonic brain. This new tool allows researchers to explore fundamental neurodevelopmental steps otherwise inaccessible in utero experimentally. Alysson Muotri, UC San Diego Stem Cell Program, explains how mini brains are generated in his lab and how this strategy can create novel therapeutical insights on neurogenetic disorders, such as autism. He also describes the use of mini-brains to explore the uniqueness of the human brain compared to other extinct species, such as the Neanderthals. Limitations and ethical concerns surrounding this exciting technology are also discussed.

Scripps Research's Stefano Forli shares about his work using computational tools to screen large libraries of compounds using methods such as high throughput virtual screening (HTVS) or designing focused virtual libraries based on specific synthetic pathways to identify molecules that can act as biological probes and novel therapeutic agents. Recorded on 01/26/2019.

A detailed overview of a study conducted by Alysson Muotri's lab at the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program which found complex network signaling developing in human cortical organoids that appear to recapitulate fetal brain development, offering an in-vitro model to study functional development of human neuronal networks.

Scientist Karl Wahlin is hoping to use the tiny retinas he's developed from stem cells to find a cure for blindness. Wahlin has teamed up with UC San Diego Stem Cell Program Director Alysson Muotri, who is using a similar technique to study the brain. Together, they hope to understand how the brain and the eye influence one another's development.

With the capacity to form any tissue in the human body, induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs, are critical to the work of the UC San Diego Stem Cell program in studying disease and potential cures - but how are they made? This short primer outlines the basic steps to how these special cells are derived.

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Professor Jennifer Doudna of UC Berkeley for a discussion of her intellectual odyssey that led to the discovery of CRISPR-Cas9, a revolutionary tool for gene editing. In the conversation, they explore the implications of CRISPR-Cas9 for agriculture, biotechnology and biomedicine. They also discuss how education and public advocacy can broaden insight into the ethical and policy dimensions of the biological revolution that is upon us. Recorded on 03/01/2019.

Nature has provided the inspiration for many of today's most important medicines, yet the need for new drugs to treat diseases such as cancer and antibiotic resistant bacterial infection remains high. Paul Jensen describes how he and other researchers are tapping into the world's oceans – home to a majority of its biodiversity – as a relatively new resource for natural product drug discovery.

CARTA celebrates its 10th anniversary with a whirlwind tour of anthropogeny, the study of the origin of humans, by addressing these questions across multiple disciplines: What do we know for certain? What do we think we know? What do we need to know? How do we proceed? Recorded on 3/23/2019.

Alysson Muotri and Catriona Jamieson discuss how cutting-edge stem-cell-based cures will reach patients through California's network of Alpha Clinics.

David Traver explores how discoveries made using tiny Zebrafish will lead to cures for blood diseases like leukemia using stem cells.

The science of stem cells and how they impact your health.
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