Science


New Videos and Podcasts
> more videos and podcasts in Science
Popular Programs
> more popular programs in Science
Science airing this week

UC San Diego Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) Department Chair Rajesh Gupta, an expert in cyber-physical systems, kicks off a conversation with two cyber security experts from the computer-science faculty in UC San Diego's Jacobs School of Engineering: Prof. Stefan Savage, and Prof. Hovav Shacham. Savage and colleagues generated controversy and debate over public policy after they demonstrated the vulnerability of modern automobiles to attack from hackers who can take advantage of internal as well as external digital components and systems in today's cars. Most recently, Prof. Shacham uncovered security vulnerabilities involving the full-body backscatter, X-ray scanners deployed at entrances to airports, train stations and other public places.

Sandra Encalada describes her work that interfaces the fields of cell biology, genetics and biochemistry in understanding the role of cellular motor-based transport in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Can we turn off the genes responsible for neurodegenerative diseases? Designer DNA drugs are making this possible. By identifying and targeting the genes that drive disease, scientists are moving closer to treatments for ALS, Huntington's disease, and more. Don W. Cleveland, PhD, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, UC San Diego joins William Mobley, MD, PhD to talk about how these drugs work and how they will impact patient care.

Taught by successful educational entrepreneur and UC San Diego Computer Science and Engineering Alumna Sarah Guthals, an innovative new course for computer science students builds the skills necessary to communicate their field to others through the experience of teaching K-12 students the fundamentals of coding in extracurricular settings in schools and libraries.

Today, the IT Industry accounts for about 2 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions, comparable to the footprint of air travel. Will IT emission eclipse air travel one day soon? Urs Hölzle thinks the clear answer is "no": he says IT energy will decrease, and perhaps decrease significantly, over the next decade. Find out why. Hölzle is Senior Vice President of Technical Infrastructure & Google Fellow and oversees the design and operation of the servers, networks, and data centers that power Google's services, as well as the development of the software infrastructure used by Google's applications. Recorded on 10/20/2017.

The atmosphere is composed of gases such as oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Other gases are present at much lower concentrations and include ozone, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides and formaldehyde just to name a few. But there is something else in the air we breathe: microscopic particles called aerosols. Vicki Grassian discusses aerosols, their many sources, and how they impact the Earth's climate and human health in ways we are just starting to understand.

This symposium addresses the interactive gene-culture co-evolution of the human brain with tool use and technology - ranging from simple stone tools millions of years ago to computers today. Recorded on 10/12/2018.

This symposium addresses the interactive gene-culture co-evolution of the human brain with tool use and technology - ranging from simple stone tools millions of years ago to computers today. Recorded on 10/12/2018.

Cancer becomes highly dangerous when it spreads from its original site to a different vital organ. These secondary tumors called metastases are what kill most patients. Despite hundreds of years of research, it is not understood why, where, and how cancer spreads to organs like the brain. Lawrence Livermore Lab scientist describes how they bring together cancer biology, 3D printing and material science, to understand and hopefully prevent metastases in the future. Recorded on 02/16/2019.

Alysson Muotri and Catriona Jamieson discuss how cutting-edge stem-cell-based cures will reach patients through California's network of Alpha Clinics.

What makes us human is a question that not only science asks, but all disciplines of mind from philosophy to religion to sociology and ethics, and even to storytelling and the arts. Tim Disney's new movie "William", about a Neanderthal living in the modern world forces us to ask that and many other questions. Director of the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program Alysson Muotri brought together a panel of experts from across a spectrum of disciplines to discuss those issues in a lively and engaging forum with the movie's creator.
Sign up for UCSD-TV's monthly e-newsletter:
contact
contact info

feedback

press

watch
tv schedule

where to watch

videos & podcasts

more info
about ucsd-tv

ucsd-tv blog

university of california, san diego

follow



©2017 Regents of the University of California. All right reserved. Terms and Conditions of Use.